Diocesan news, November 16, 2018

Stewards working on stewardship — The Stewardship Works! Networking Group prays before one of its bimonthly meetings Tuesday, Nov. 6, in Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s meeting room in the Chancery in Wichita. The group has been meeting every other month for a year to pray, to share ideas and challenges, to learn from each other, and to celebrate successes about the stewardship way of life. Twelve parishes were represented at the meeting with the bishop: Blessed Sacrament, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Thomas Aquinas, Church of the Magdalen, St. Anne, and St. Catherine of Siena, Wichita; St. Vincent de Paul, Andover; St. Peter the Apostle, Schulte; Our Lady of Lourdes, Pittsburg; Sacred Heart, Colwich; St. Mary, Derby; and St. John, Clonmel. (Advance photo)

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar for the next several weeks.
November
Nov. 18: St. Paul University Parish Mass at 10 a.m.; Vietnamese Martyr’s Mass at All Saints at 3:45 p.m.
Nov. 19: Mass for Regan Institute at Kapaun Mt. Carmel at 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 20: Mass for Regan Institute at Our Lady of Lourdes in Pittsburg at 9 a.m.
Nov. 24: Final Profession Immaculate Heart of Mary
Nov. 28: Confirmation Mass for Church of the Magdalen at 6:30 p.m.
Nov. 29: Prospective Seminarian Dinner at bishop’s residence
December
Dec. 1: Confirmation Mass at St. Anne, Wichita at 3 p.m.
Dec. 2: Confirmation Mass at St. Anne, Wichita at 3 p.m.
Dec. 4-5: St. Joseph House of Formation Episcopal visit
Dec. 5: Confirmation Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas, Wichita at 6:30 p.m.
Dec. 7: Confirmation Mass at Holy Name, Coffeyville at 6:30 p.m.
Dec. 8: Lunch with Prospective Seminarians in Pittsburg: Confirmation Mass at St. Patrick, Parsons at 5 p.m.
Dec. 9: Confessions at St. Mary, Newton at 7 p.m.
Dec. 11: Charter Review Board: Legatus: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe Mass at 11:15 p.m. at the Cathedral
Dec. 12: Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Newton at 7 p.m.
Dec. 13: Presbyteral Council: Serra Club Christmas Party.

Fatima Pilgrimage Statue to visit Diocese of Wichita beginning Dec. 7
The Fatima Pilgrimage Statue will visit the Diocese of Wichita next month for a week.
It will arrive at Wichita’s Eisenhower National Airport on Friday, Dec. 7, accompanied by several missionary sisters.
Here is the schedule for the visit:
Friday-Saturday, Dec. 7-8: Immaculate Heart of Mary Convent, south of Colwich
Sunday, Dec. 9: Church of the Blessed Sacrament, Wichita; Mass that afternoon with Bishop Carl A. Kemme presiding, time pending
Monday, Dec. 10: St. Mary Parish, Newton
Tuesday-Wed., Dec. 11-12: Our Lady of Lourdes, Pittsburg
Thursday, Dec. 13: Statue departs Wichita
The faithful are invited to venerate the statue. The pilgrimage is being coordinated by The Alliance of the Holy Family International and is an extension of a pilgrimage of six statues blessed by Pope Francis and sent around the world in 2017 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Fatima apparitions.

Advent Day of Reflection Dec. 4
The Office of Marriage and Family Life invites all adults to join it for its 2018 Advent Day of Reflection with Father Adam Grelinger and Father Pat York from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The cost is $10 per person, which includes lunch. Those interested are encouraged to make their reservations as soon as possible. To do so, call 316-744-0167 or email slc@slcwichita.org to register. Reservations are due by Nov. 27.

Annual Vietnamese Martyrs Memorial Nov. 16-17
This year marks the 30th year the Vietnamese Martyrs were canonized by Pope St. John Paul II.
The Catholic Diocese of Wichita Vietnamese Congregation will have a Memorial Mass honoring the 117 Vietnamese Martyrs starting with an opening Mass on Friday, Nov. 16, at 6 p.m. and will continue on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at All Saints Parish and the Fischer Center, 3205 E. Grand in Wichita.
The retreat theme is “Fully Alive,” following the examples of the martyrs. There will be holy hour and exposition of the Blessed Sacrament during the retreat.
Vietnamese- and English-speaking priests will be available for confession Friday and Saturday throughout the retreat. Additional reconciliation time will be at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18, prior to the procession of the Holy Martyr relics starting at 3:30 p.m. Mass will begin at 3:45 p.m.
Food will be served after Mass. Everyone is cordially invited to the special celebration.

Dirty Vagabond Ministries speaker to give talk Dec. 10
Andy Churray, a missionary for Dirty Vagabond Ministries, will speak from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
Wichita’s Catholic urban youth ministry is a non-profit organization that strives to serve inner-city and urban teens where they are and introduce them to Jesus.
Churray will share his testimony about how he got involved and the fruits he has seen while working as a missionary.
All are invited to enjoy this evening presentation. The cost is $10 per person.

Clinic hosting Our Lady Guadalupe celebration Dec. 12
The Guadalupe Clinic is hosting a celebration of Our Lady of Guadalupe on her feast day Wednesday, Dec. 12.
A Mass will be celebrated at 5 p.m. in the chapel of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ motherhouse, south of Newman University. A reception will follow at 6 p.m. at the Guadalupe Clinic, 940 S. St. Francis. At 6:30 p.m., a free dinner will be served, followed by an awards ceremony for clinic staff and volunteers.
Those interested are asked to make a reservation by Saturday, Dec. 1, by contacting Elena at (316) 264-8974 ext. 203 or at edozal@guadalupeclinic.com.

St. Cecilia Sing Nov. 18 at ASC convent
All parish choirs, cantors, and instrumentalists – and their families and friends – are invited to attend the St. Cecilia Sing Sunday, Nov. 18, at the Adorers of the Blood of Christ Convent, 1165 Southwest Blvd., in Wichita.
The program begins at 2 p.m. and includes prayer, the life of St. Cecilia, choir performances, and congregational singing. An optional tour of the convent chapel will be conducted at 3:30 p.m. A reception begins at 4.

Ugandan church ready for a roof — With the walls nearly complete on the St. Kizito Church building project in Madudu, Uganda, Father Vincent Kajoba, the pastor, will soon be taking bids to begin construction on the roof. Father Kojoba was in the Diocese of Wichita much of the summer to serve as a substitute priest for vacationing diocesan priests and to share the story of his parish project. He also spent time in the diocese educating the faithful about the strong faith of the Catholics in Uganda, and appealing for financial aid for his poor parish. (Courtesy photo)

Spiritual Life Center news, November 16, 2018

SLC to host weekend retreat about Immaculate Conception Holy Day
The faithful are invited to a new weekend retreat called “The Immaculate Conception Retreat” Dec. 7-9 at the Spiritual Life Center.
The director of the SLC, Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke, will lead the weekend which will focus upon Mary, the Mother of God, and our mother. Time will be set aside for prayer, a few short conferences on Mary’s role in the Church, and Eucharistic Adoration.
The program begins Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. and goes through lunch on Sunday, but the retreat is formatted in such a way that even partial attendance is welcomed and encouraged.
“If someone can only come for Friday evening, or just Saturday, we would still love to have them! This retreat is designed to fit into nearly anyone’s schedule,” said Fr. Van Haverbeke, “We want people to be able to invest some time growing spiritually this Advent.”
Regular retreat pricing applies for attending the entire weekend. To attend for part of the weekend, please call the center for the rate. Full weekend reservations can made online at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167.

Scout Day of Reflection Saturday at the SLC
The Catholic Committee on Scouting is hosting a Day of Reflection Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The day is for youth currently working on these religious emblems: Ad Altare Dei, Marian Medal, or Spirit Alive.
The day begins at 8 a.m. with Mass followed by registration at 8:45 a.m. It concludes at 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for youth and adults, to help cover lunch.
Preregister by contacting Kathy Petr at kpetr@cox.net or at 686-7893.

Retrouvaille begins Nov. 30 at SLC
A weekend for couples whose marriages need healing will be held Nov. 30-Dec. 2 at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
Retrouvaille is Christian-based and Catholic in origin but welcomes couples of all faiths.
To register, or more information, visit HelpOurMarriage.com.

Faithful gather to ‘battle’ against forces of death

Some of the over 200 pro-lifers who participated in the second annual Mass for Life listen to Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s homily outside of the abortion clinic in Wichita. Bishop Kemme also led a Eucharist Procession along the accessible sides of the building. The Mass was celebrated on a city street west of the clinic. (Advance photo)

Last Saturday’s Mass for Life was celebrated on a crisp, sunny day, with over 200 persons united in prayer, framed against a backdrop of trees adorned with fall colors. The event, however, was somber.
“We gather yet again in this place to pray, to do penance and to gain the strength we need to fight the greatest battle of our wayward times, the battle between life and death, the outcome of which will affect millions of innocent souls,” Bishop Carl A. Kemme said during the Mass which was celebrated for the second time in two years on the city street west of Wichita’s abortion clinic.
With traffic noise from nearby Kellogg as a constant background, Bishop Kemme said those attending came as disciples of Christ “to bring the Sanctifying Grace of the Most Blessed Sacrament to this place of death.”
He added that he hoped the Mass would “change the hearts of those who support what goes on behind these walls, those who work here, and those who come here to kill an unborn child, so that all life will be received, wanted, and granted a chance to flourish.”
Bishop Kemme then talked about the Gospel reading regarding how a thief’s intentions are to steal, slaughter, and destroy.
“This is the stark and shocking truth of this place behind me and those like it around the world,” he said in front of the windowless abortion clinic wall.
“Here, life is stolen, slaughtered and destroyed; all under the guise of freedom run amiss, a freedom that throws God’s first and most important gift back in his face. Here, lives are destroyed, most obviously the life of an unborn child, who did nothing to deserve this death sentence.”
In addition to the lives lost, he said, the results of abortions are maladies such as depression, reproductive and other physical illnesses that can be directly attributed to the abortion, in addition to the social, emotional, and spiritual illnesses that arise in many post-abortive mothers.
“There is also something profoundly stolen from would-be fathers of these children, who by nature and instinct were created to provide and protect, even for the child or children they will never know,” he said. “So much death and destruction.”
Bishop Kemme also said the wolves mentioned in the Gospel of the day were an appropriate image for those in the abortion industry, that they were wolves in sheep’s clothing, masking themselves and what they do as healthcare. “This is a lie. These wolves need to be exposed for who they are and what they do.”
After mentioning the documentary about the infamous Kermit Gosnell, one of the country’s most notorious abortionists, he said it was vital that the faithful know who the enemy is and how the enemy attacks.
“The wolf attacks the most innocent and defenseless of the sheep; he scatters them and rips them out of the shepherd’s arms. The wolves among us in our society must be fought, not with a similar type of violence as some in the past have mistakenly adopted, but rather with the weapons of the Kingdom of Light and Life,” Bishop Kemme said.
“Those weapons are prayer, which strengthens us for the battle upon us; vigilance, including keeping watch here on location so that any opportunity to legally intervene in this industry will not be missed; proclamation of the truth so that the lies of this industry will be exposed and that the dignity of every human person from the moment of fertilization until natural death will be heard; and finally participation in the public life of our society, including conscientious and informed voting, offering oneself for public service and office and education of our people, especially youth and young adults so that in the near future, ours will once again be a culture of and for life.”
Bishop Kemme thanked those who attended the Mass, especially their unyielding dedication to the promotion of the dignity of every human person at every stage of life.
Fathers Gabe Greer and Chandra Potnuru assisted at the Mass, which is sponsored by the diocesan Office of Respect Life and Social Justice. Lectors and servers were Bishop Carroll Catholic High School students. Music was provided by the Region 3 CYM band.

Music at the Mass for Life was led by the Region 3 CYM band. (Advance photo)

Diocesan news, November 2, 2018

Benedictine Oblates serve and learn — Benedictine Oblates of Conception Abbey served guests and participated in a retreat Oct. 19-21 at the abbey in Conception, Missouri. Author and journalist Judith Valente talked about “Being Truly Alive: Living the Rule of St. Benedict Day by Day” at the retreat. From left are Pat Lowrance of St. James Parish in Augusta; Karen Saltkill, St. Andrew Parish, Abilene; Judith Valente; and Anne Mosier, St. James, Augusta. (Courtesy photo)

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar for the next several weeks.
November
Nov. 1-3: Seminary visit to Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Nov. 6: Diocesan Stewardship Council meeting; Prospective Seminarian Dinner (East) at Bishop’s Residence
Nov. 7: Prospective Seminarian Dinner (West) at Bishop’s Residence
Nov. 8: Catholic Charities Board of Directors Chairman’s Luncheon
Nov. 11-15: USCCB General meeting in Baltimore
Nov. 16: Curia Thanksgiving Mass and Luncheon
Nov. 18: St. Paul University Parish Mass at 10 a.m.; Vietnamese Martyr’s Mass at All Saints at 4 p.m.
Nov. 19: Mass for Regan Institute at Kapaun Mt. Carmel at 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 20: Mass for Regan Institute at Our Lady of Lourdes in Pittsburg at 9 a.m.
Nov. 24: Final Profession Immaculate Heart of Mary
Nov. 28: Confirmation Mass for Church of the Magdalen at 6:30 p.m.
Nov. 29: Prospective Seminarian Dinner at bishop’s residence
December
Dec. 1: Confirmation Mass at St. Anne, Wichita at 3 p.m.

Nourish support group meeting Nov. 8
A Nourish support meeting for caregivers will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at the St. Joseph Pastoral Center 437 N. Topeka, Wichita. November’s topic will be “The Spirituality of Asking for and Receiving Help.”
For more information call the Office of Marriage and Family Life 685-5240 or the Office of Ministry with Persons with Disabilities 269-3900.

St. Cecilia Sing Nov. 18 at the ASC convent
All parish choirs, cantors, and instrumentalists – and their families and friends – are invited to attend the St. Cecilia Sing Sunday, Nov. 18, at the Adorers of the Blood of Christ Convent, 1165 Southwest Blvd., in Wichita.
The program begins at 2 p.m. and includes prayer, the life of St. Cecilia, choir performances, and congregational singing. An optional tour of the convent chapel will be conducted at 3:30 p.m. A reception begins at 4.
Reservations are requested. To do so email npmwichita.org by Nov. 13.

Diocesan priests leading pilgrimage to France and Italy
Fathers Jerome Spexarth and Nicholas Voelker are planning to lead a pilgrimage to Lourdes, France, and Italy April 29 to May 9.
Pilgrims will visit Lourdes for three nights and take part in the rosary processions, miraculous baths, and tour St. Bernadette’s home. From there they will visit Rome, Sienna, Orvieto, and Assisi Italy. All the popular sites in Rome will be visited.
The cost for the 11-day all-inclusive tour is $3,945 and will include Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica.
For a brochure or more information, call Suzie Diskin at 620-449-2783 or 800-842-4842, or visit www.SelectInternationalTours.com, click on scheduled tours, destination, France.

Barnes & Noble book fair Saturday, Nov. 10
The 11th Annual Barnes & Noble Book fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, to benefit nine Catholic schools in Wichita, Coffeyville, and Newton.
The event’s goal is to improve reading levels by providing new classroom and library books. At least 70 percent of the students in the benefitting schools receiving either free or reduced lunches and do not have the means to buy new library books.
To help the schools:
• Purchase a book at Barnes & Noble for the school library. Many books have already been chosen for the schools. The books will be delivered to the schools.
• Make a purchase and tell a cashier you are with the book fair. The school will receive a percentage of the sale from all sales, including coffee.
• Mail a check by Nov. 4 to any of the following schools or to the St. Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund, 424 N. Broadway, Wichita, KS 67202. Or donate on-line at https://give.DatholicDioceseOfWichita.org/pages/Drexel/book-donation.
Participating Wichita schools are All Saints, Christ the King, Holy Savior, St. Anne, St. Joseph, St. Margaret Mary, St. Patrick; Holy Name, Coffeyville; and St. Mary, Newton.

Patriotic rosary Monday, Nov. 5, at the Cathedral
Harvest House members along with the diocesan offices of Senior Adult Ministries and Marriage and Family Life will lead a patriotic rosary at 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
Coffee will be served in the Gathering Space at 9:30.
Participants will pray for all veterans, members of our military, the president, leaders of our country, and the consecration of our nation.
Anyone is welcome to the rosary.

Spiritual Life Center news, November 2, 2018

Weekend retreat with Saint Thérèse of Lisieux at SLC set for Nov. 9-11
A weekend retreat on Nov. 9-11 at the Spiritual Life Center will take participants on a journey through Scripture with Saint Thérèse of Lisieux. Brother Joseph Schmidt will lead the weekend.
The “Little Flower,” as Saint Thérèse is often called, is one of the most popular saints of our time. Pope St. John Paul II wrote that her “little way” is nothing other than the gospel way of holiness for all.
During the retreat, Br. Joseph, the author of the best-selling book “Everything Is Grace: The Life and Way of Thérèse of Lisieux,” helps retreatants understand Thérèse’s message through the Scripture passages that illuminated her insights about God and his merciful love.
Participants will be guided during the retreat to discover how their own relationship with the Lord might be transformed by the Little Way of St. Thérèse.
Weekend retreats at the SLC include five meals, all conferences, Mass and quiet prayer time. Brother Schmidt is a De LaSalle Christian Brother currently based in Philadelphia, he serves as a spiritual director, lecturer, and retreat master.
Want to participate?
Regular retreat pricing applies for the weekend. Register and pay by Oct. 29 to receive an early bird discount. All registrations include a $50 non-refundable deposit. Reservations can be made on line at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167. Please register in advance to ensure space and food quantities.

Book club meets on Thursday Nov. 8
The first fall Good Books meeting will be about Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop on Thursday, Nov. 8 at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita. The course meets monthly throughout the winter for participants to learn about how a novel relates to Christians.
Kapaun Mt. Carmel teacher Nate Arrida will lead the sessions from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 8, Dec. 6, and Jan. 3. The cost for the course is $30. The book to be discussed will be available in the center’s bookstore.
To register visit www.SLCWichita.org or call (316) 744-0167. Pre-registration is requested but walk-ins are welcome.

Advent Day of Reflection Dec. 4
The Office of Marriage and Family Life invites all adults to participate in the 2018 Advent Day of Reflection with Father Adam Grelinger and Father Pat York from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The cost is $10 per person, which includes lunch. Those interested are encouraged to make their reservations as soon as possible. To do so, call 316-744-0167 or email slc@slcwichita.org to register. Reservations are due by Nov. 27.

Scout Day of Reflection Nov. 17 at the SLC
The Catholic Committee on Scouting is hosting a Day of Reflection Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The day is for youth currently working on these religious emblems: Ad Atare Dei, Marian Medal, or Spirit Alive.
The day begins at 8 a.m. with Mass followed by registration at 8:45 a.m. It concludes at 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for youth and adults, to help cover lunch.
Preregister by contacting Kathy Petr at kpetr@cox.net or at 686-7893.
The Catholic Committee on Scouting works with all youth who belong to Cub or Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little Flowers, and American Heritage Girls.

Emotions Anonymous meeting Wednesdays
Emotions Anonymous open meetings are held from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Spiritual Life Center.
The meetings are for those who are experiencing overwhelming emotions such as anxiety, anger, resentment, shame, or fear. The 12-step group is designed to offer support and serenity while living with unsolved problems.
No registration is necessary. For more information, call the center at 316-744-0167.

Youth and school news, November 2, 2018

First place in CSAL — The St. Joseph, Ost, Lady Crusaders took first place in the CSAL 8th grade Mount Carmel Volleyball Tournament Oct. 11-16 at Holy Cross Lutheran in Wichita. Front, from left, Natalie Helten, Mariah Cordova, and Emmarie Cook. In back, from left, are Coach Susan Helten, Kayla Seiler, Macrina Huffman, Kaitlin Robben, Cloie Andree, Olivia May, Jacinta Allen, Madison Helten, and Gretchen Stuhlsatz. Not pictured are Coaches Justina Scranton Jamie Gorges. (Courtesy photo)

Last year’s KMC publications honored
The 2017-2018 Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School’s Paladin staff recently received the highest available rating of Gold Medalist from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Editors were Kinta Kail, Jacob Morss and Thomas Searl.
The 2017-2018 Crusader yearbook also received a Gold Medalist rating from the CSPA, the highest possible.
Editors were Emily Ostmeyer and Leah Brock.

Winfield hosting school gala Nov. 10
Winfield’s Holy Name PTO will host an inaugural Gratitude Gala Saturday, Nov. 10, to benefit the school.
The gala will include a barbecue-style dinner, drinks, and live and silent auctions. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Dinner will begin at 6:30, followed by the auction.
Mass will be celebrated before the event, at 4:30 p.m. in the church.
PTO President Brad Ziegler said the group is currently raising funds to make improvements to the school as well as purchase an updated science curriculum.
Holy Name Catholic School is a fully accredited, parochial school serving about 55 students and their families. Nearly 40 percent of the school’s students qualify for free or reduced lunches. Holy Name Catholic School is supported by the generous stewardship of its parish and community.
A limited number of tickets are still available and can be purchased by contacting the school at 620-221-0230. Anyone wishing to make a donation may contact the school or call Father Ken Schuckman at 620-221-3610.

Scout Day of Reflection Nov. 17 at the SLC
The Catholic Committee on Scouting is hosting a Day of Reflection Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The day is for youth currently working on these religious emblems: Ad Atare Dei, Marian Medal, or Spirit Alive.
The day begins at 8 a.m. with Mass followed by registration at 8:45 a.m. It concludes at 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for youth and adults, to help cover lunch.
Preregister by contacting Kathy Petr at kpetr@cox.net or at 686-7893.
The Catholic Committee on Scouting works with all youth who belong to Cub or Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little Flowers, and American Heritage Girls.

KMC Future Crusader Day Thursday, Nov. 8
Eighth grade students are invited to Future Crusader Day from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8.
The event will kick off with Mass at 8 a.m., followed by a brief history of the school. Students will break into groups to tour the school and hear presentations from various departments, clubs, activities, and athletics.
Eighth graders who are not enrolled in one of the diocesan Catholic grade schools and would like to attend, may contact Anne Lutz at alutz@kapaun.org or at 316-634-0315 ext. 147.
Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. at the main entrance at 8506 E. Central. Parents are welcome to attend with their students.

Barnes & Noble book fair Saturday, Nov. 10
The 11th Annual Barnes & Noble Book fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, to benefit nine Catholic schools in Wichita, Coffeyville, and Newton.
The event’s goal is to improve reading levels by providing new classroom and library books. At least 70 percent of the students in the benefitting schools receiving either free or reduced lunches and do not have the means to buy new library books.
To help the schools:
• Purchase a book at Barnes & Noble for the school library. Many books have already been chosen for the schools. The books will be delivered to the schools.
• Make a purchase and tell a cashier you are with the book fair. The school will receive a percentage of the sale from all sales, including coffee.
• Mail a check by Nov. 4 to any of the following schools or to the St. Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund, 424 N. Broadway, Wichita, KS 67202. Or donate on-line at https://give.DatholicDioceseOfWichita.org/pages/Drexel/book-donation.
Participating Wichita schools are All Saints, Christ the King, Holy Savior, St. Anne, St. Joseph, St. Margaret Mary, St. Patrick; Holy Name, Coffeyville; and St. Mary, Newton.

Diocese remembers the legacies, prays for Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber

Bishops, priests, and seminarians filled the sanctuary at the funeral of Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber Tuesday, Oct. 9, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita. The Book of the Gospels is on top of his wooden coffin. (Advance photos)

The Diocese of Wichita bade farewell to its beloved shepherd, Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber, at his funeral Mass Tuesday, Oct. 9, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
Eleven bishops from across the Midwest and nearly all of the priests of the Diocese of Wichita concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Carl A. Kemme who was assisted by all of the seminarians of the diocese.
Bishop Kemme talked in his homily about Bishop Gerber’s understanding that he likened himself to a fruit-bearing branch grafted to the vine of Christ and pruned over time to be evermore fruitful.
“These fruits are the many realities in our diocese that owe their existence in large measure to Bishop Gerber’s pastoral vision and deeply caring heart, Bishop Kemme said. “We know these realities well and it is hard for us to imagine diocesan life without them, but we dare not ever take them for granted.”
He first mentioned stewardship as a way of life. “Bishop Gerber once wrote that he didn’t find stewardship; it found him and changed his entire vision and way of living.”
Bishop Kemme said Bishop Gerber’s “baby,” of course, was The Lord’s Diner. “I will long remember the pride with which he spoke of his vision for The Lord’s Diner to the many family and guests at my own ordination luncheon, which was held in that sacred place.”
He also mentioned the Spiritual Life Center, and the Catholic Care Center, about which Bishop Gerber said, “We cannot care for everyone, but we can show how everyone should be cared for.”
Bishop Kemme talked about how Bishop Gerber understood that the source of “stewardship grace” in the diocese was the adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. “How true that surely is. His promotion of adoration chapels has truly changed the landscape of our diocese.”
Bishop Gerber was also instrumental in the merger of the Catholic hospitals in Wichita into Via Christi, the way of Christ. Related to the hospitals is the love he had for the Guadalupe Clinic, a diocesan health ministry, Bishop Kemme said, praising him about how he nurtured Catholic Charities’ ministries of the St. Anthony Family Shelter, Harbor House, and Adult Day Care Services.
The diocesan partnership with Newman University was strengthened and has resulted in the offering of advanced degrees in theology and pastoral ministry, as well as his support for the new Gerber Science Center, a state of the art facility for those being trained in the fields of health and health-related science.
“He loved his priests and seminarians and wanted the presbyterate to grow and become even more dedicated,” Bishop Kemme said. “He set the bar high for seminarian recruitment and formation, resulting today in a larger than usual presbyterate.”
Bishop Gerber would be quick to point out that the things he will be remembered for are not about him, Bishop Kemme said. “These are here solely to glorify God and not us. Cursed will we be, if we ever forget this. Bishop Gerber would not allow himself to be glorified by any of these accomplishments and nor should we.”
It is now up to those still on this side of death, he said, to “further these good works and others and to infuse them with the sustaining power of our faith, so that we, who have received them as blessings, will become fully alive, as he was, as missionary disciples of Jesus Christ.”
Bishop Kemme opened his homily by recalling the aphorism that people will not always remember what we say to them, but they will always remember how we made them feel.
“I am certain that each of us has had the experience of sharing an encounter, a meeting, a moment with Bishop Gerber when he made us feel as though we were the only one in the room or that we were so very important to him, indeed, a dear friend, he said.
“This is how I imagine the ministry of Jesus Christ as he walked the roads of Palestine and met the many people we hear about in the Gospel. Bishop Gerber modeled that unique and life changing ability.”
Bishop Kemme said he felt that every time he met Bishop Gerber. “I relished those seemingly chance meetings when I could ask him for some advice and receive the blessing of his experience and wisdom,” he said. “Bishop Gerber never came to those moments without his characteristically infectious smile which lit up his face as our eyes met and as our greetings were exchanged, the extension of his warm handshake, and his usual expression, ‘it is so good to see you.’”
He added that he will be forever grateful to have been given the privilege of knowing and loving him as a brother bishop and to witness the profound impact he has had on the church and the diocese.
About two weeks previous, Bishop Kemme said, he had what would be his last encounter with Bishop Gerber.
“As he and I sat together at the table for lunch at the Priest Retirement Center and when the others had already left, I asked about his health, which he was always reticent to talk about, but which I knew to be increasingly deteriorating. He paused and looked deeply into my eyes and said, ‘Carl, I am ready for whatever God wants and whenever he wants it. I have only gratitude.’
“As I walked back to my home, not knowing of course those would be the last words he would speak to me in this life, I felt a deep sense of blessing. To come to the end of one’s long, and yet challenging life and ministry, to have weathered the many storms of life and service in the church, such as Bishop Gerber did, much of it hidden from the observance of his family, fellow priests, and many friends, and to come to a sense of deep and abiding peace and gratitude, is no small gift.”
Bishop Kemme said gratitude is the essence of stewardship, which will always be associated with Bishop Gerber.
“He knew, and more importantly, lived stewardship as a grateful response of a Christian disciple, who recognizes God’s gifts and shares these gifts in love of God and neighbor. Bishop Gerber was undeniably a true Christian steward to the very end, having ‘only gratitude’ to take with him into the Kingdom of heaven.”
Bishop Gerber was an “amazing gift of a man,” he said, who in 87 years, in addition to being a devoted, son, brother, uncle, and great uncle, was also called to be a faithful servant priest and pastor, and a pastoral and sensitively caring bishop.
“In all of this, he was the consummate Christian disciple,” he said. “We thank God for Bishop Gerber’s life and ministry as we entrust his noble soul to our eternal Father and as we reverently bury his body, as a temple of the Triune God, in the ground of this world he love so much.
“There it will wait in hope for the resurrection to a new life, in that new heaven and that new earth promised and bequeathed to us by God himself. May our prayer and praise deepen our own grateful response to God’s abundant blessings as we strive to model our own stewardship after his so that we too will share the glory the we believe to be his now and for all eternity.”
Concelebrating along with the diocesan priests and visiting priests were Abp. Paul Coakley, of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City; Bishop James Conley and Bishop Emeritus Fabian W. Bruskewitz of the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska; Bishop Gerald L. Vincke of the Diocese of Salina; Bishop Emeritus Ronald M. Gilmore and Bishop John B. Brungardt of the Diocese of Dodge City; Abp. Joseph F. Naumann of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas; Bishop William Shawn McKnight and Bishop Emeritus John R. Gaydos of the Diocese of Jefferson City, Missouri; Bishop Edward M. Rice, bishop of the Diocese of Springfield-Cape Girardeau in Missouri; and Abbot Benedict Neenan of Conception Abbey in Missouri.
Pallbearers were Fathers David Lies, Patrick York, John Lanzrath, Daniel Spexarth, Ken Van Haverbeke, and Matt McGinness. Over 100 persons, the staff, volunteers, friends and guests of The Lord’s Diner, the Guadalupe Clinic, Harbor House, St. Anthony Family Shelter, and Newman University were honorary pallbearers.
Special instrumentalists accompanied the Cathedral’s music ministry, which was joined by the St. Anthony Parish Vietnamese Choir. Honor guards were Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus and Knights and Dames of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulcher of Jerusalem.
A lunch was held in Good Shepherd hall after the Mass. Burial was at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita that afternoon.

Bishop Emeritus Ronald Gilmore delivered the homily at the vigil that night. (Advance photos)

Bishop Gilmore homilist at vespers
Bishop Emeritus Ronald Gilmore, retired bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City and a priest under Bishop Gerber, gave the homily at the solemn vespers Monday night in the Cathedral.
After talking about the “heart” of Bishop Gerber and mentioning the “outside” of Bishop Gerber that the public knew – stewardship, the Catholic Life Center, the Spiritual Life Center, and The Lord’s Diner – Bishop Gilmore described the interior of Bishop Gerber as “the sharing of Trinitarian life.”
Bishop Gilmore also likened Bishop Gerber to Job, whom he described as kindred spirits, searchers in hard times, who “died old and full of years.”
“Job said: ‘I have dealt with things I do not understand; things too wonderful for me which I cannot know,’” Bishop Gilmore said. “Bishop Gerber told me similar things many, many, times over the years I worked with him: things he did not understand; things too filled with wonder for words; things past his knowing.”
All of you know the outside story of Bishop Gerber’s life, he said. “Not many of you know the inside story of this simple, but many-layered man.”

Bishop Carl A. Kemme talked about his memories of Bishop Gerber in his homily at Bishop Gerber’s funeral Mass.
Visitors pray over the body of Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber Monday afternoon, Oct. 8, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
A book of the Gospels, below, sits atop Bishop Gerber’s casket at this funeral Oct. 9.
Dodge City Bishop Emeritus Ronald Gilmore, wearing a mitre, and Archbishop Paul Coakley, of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City, at the vigil service on Oct. 8
Bishops from throughout the Midwest attended the funeral Mass of Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber.
The church crowd overflowed into the gathering space.

Pro-life ministry opens sonogram building

Bishop Carl A. Kemme leads a blessing ceremony in front of a packed house at A Better Choice’s new sonogram building on East Central in Wichita. (Advance photo)

A Better Choice is helping women make more informed choices after opening a sonogram building just west of its regular offices at 3001 E. Central in Wichita.
Bishop Carl A. Kemme blessed the building Thursday, Oct. 11, during an open house.
ABC’s Executive Director, Valerie Alexander, said the agency’s sonogram equipment provides women the opportunity to glimpse their baby for the very first time.
“That moment, when a woman sees her child's heartbeat, can be life changing,” she said. “In fact, life saving. These sonograms help each woman to realize the sanctity of the life within her and to help her make a life giving choice for her baby.”
The pro-life ministry makes sonograms available five days a week and is able to do three to four sonograms a day.
“We are able to minister to these women through our Catholic faith…and it is truly our privilege to offer that to them,” Alexander said.
The ministry provides pregnancy services at no charge to women in need. The mission of ABCs expanded services is to provide more appointment options for ultrasounds.
By state law, a woman needs access to sonogram technology to make a decision concerning the life of her unborn child. The ministry believes that scientific evidence, especially the baby’s heartbeat, highlights the humanity within her and is often the deciding factor for life.

Bishop Kemme supports recent USCCB measures to protect children from abuse

Bishop Carl A. Kemme fully embraces recent measures taken by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops as a result of the recent sexual abuse revelations.
“As a bishop, with the duty to protect and to heal, I fully support the steps being proposed by the Administrative Committee of the USCCB as well as the intentions of the bishops to enter into a period of penance and purification as we address the current crisis in leadership in the church.”
The committee has invited all bishops to join in acts of prayer and penance, stating: “This is a time of deep examination of conscience for each bishop. We cannot content ourselves that our response to sexual assault within the church has been sufficient. Scripture must be our guide forward, “be doers of the word and not hearers only.” (James 1:22)
Bishop Kemme adds: “In all of this, we do not want anyone – ourselves included – to lose sight of those who have suffered from those who have acted or failed to act as the Gospel demanded. For survivors of sexual abuse, these days may re-open deep wounds. Support is available from the church and within the community. Victims Assistance Coordinators are available in every diocese to help you find resources. We are grateful to hundreds of dedicated people who, since the adoption of the 2002 Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, have been working with the church to support survivors and prevent future abuse.”
The Administrative Committee took the following actions regarding the matter:
1. Approved the establishment of a third-party reporting system that will receive confidentially, by phone and online, complaints of sexual abuse of minors by a bishop and sexual harassment of or sexual misconduct with adults by a bishop and will direct those complaints to the appropriate ecclesiastical authority and, as required by applicable law, to civil authorities.
2. Instructed the USCCB Committee on Canonical Affairs and Church Governance to develop proposals for policies addressing restrictions on bishops who were removed or resigned because of allegations of sexual abuse of minors or sexual harassment of or misconduct with adults, including seminarians and priests.
3. Initiated the process of developing a Code of Conduct for bishops regarding the sexual abuse of a minor; sexual harassment of or sexual misconduct with an adult; or negligence in the exercise of his office related to such cases.
4. Supported a full investigation into the situation surrounding Archbishop McCarrick, including his alleged assaults on minors, priests, and seminarians, as well any responses made to those allegations. Such an investigation should rely upon lay experts in relevant fields, such as law enforcement and social services.

Need to report a child safety issue?
To report any suspicion of child abuse or neglect, call the Kansas Department for Children and Families at 1-800-922-5330. If a child is in immediate danger, call 911. To report suspected abuse to the Diocese of Wichita, call Therese Seiler at 316-269-3945. You are encouraged to make contact with one, or all, of these entities if you suspect the abuse of a child.

Diocesan news, October 19, 2018

Beethoven for dinner at the Diner — Kelly Hall-Tomkins entertained patrons of The Lord’s Diner Friday, Sept. 14, strolling around the tables playing a Beethoven violin concerto. Tompkins was in Wichita for a concert. She is a frequent soloist with orchestras around the world and has been a soloist in over 400 Broadway performances. (Photo courtesy June Etta Photography)

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar for the next several weeks.
October
Oct. 21: White Mass at Chapel of the Sorrowful Mother at 11 a.m. at Via Christi St. Francis; Wichita Adore Ministry Benefit Dinner at 5:30 p.m. at St. Peter, Schulte
Oct. 22-24: Mundelein Seminary visit
Oct. 25: Mass for Curia Directors Retreat; Diocesan Pastoral Council
Oct. 26: Curia Day of Recollection
Oct. 27: Mass for Life at Southwind Clinic at 9 a.m.
Oct. 28: Mass for healing for those whose dignity has been victimized by the sins of abortion and abuse at 10 a.m. at the Cathedral
Oct. 31: Seminary visit to Holy Trinity Seminary
November
Nov. 1-3: Seminary visit to Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Nov. 6: Diocesan Stewardship Council meeting; Prospective Seminarian Dinner (East) at Bishop’s Residence
Nov. 7: Prospective Seminarian Dinner (West) at Bishop’s Residence
Nov. 8: Catholic Charities Board of Directors Chairman’s Luncheon
Nov. 11-15: USCCB General meeting in Baltimore
Nov. 16: Curia Thanksgiving Mass and Luncheon
Nov. 18: St. Paul University Parish Mass at 10 a.m.; Vietnamese Martyr’s Mass at All Saints at 4 p.m.
Nov. 19: Mass for Regan Institute at Kapaun Mt. Carmel at 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 20: Mass for Regan Institute at Our Lady of Lourdes in Pittsburg at 9 a.m.

Rachel’s Vineyard retreat Oct. 26-28
A Rachel’s Vineyard retreat for those who are suffering from abortion will be held at the end of the month in Kansas City.
The last of the three 2018 Kansas City retreats will be on the weekend of Oct. 26-28.
For more information or to register, please call Teresa O’Donnell at (816) 679-4973 or email rvkcmo@gmail.com or visit www.rachelsvineyardkc.org.

Patriotic rosary Monday, Nov. 5, at the Cathedral
Harvest House members along with the diocesan offices of Senior Adult Ministries and Marriage and Family Life will lead a patriotic rosary at 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
Coffee will be served in the Gathering Space at 9:30.
Participants will pray for all veterans, members of our military, the president, leaders of our country, and the consecration of our nation. All are welcome.

Health care professionals’ White Mass this Sunday at Via Christi St. Francis
A White Mass for doctors, nurses, and other health-care professionals will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, in the Chapel of the Sorrowful Mother at Via Christi Hospital St. Francis in Wichita.
Bishop Carl A. Kemme will celebrate the Mass.
For many years Via Christi has jointly sponsored the White Mass with the Diocese of Wichita and the St. Gianna Guild, a charted guild of the Catholic Medical Association in Wichita.
The St. Gianna Guild is composed of more than 20 active Catholic physicians, residents, medical school students, and others who meet regularly to share their faith. Fr. Joseph Tatro and Fr. Michael Brungardt both serve as chaplains.
A Blue Mass, honoring first responders, and a Red Mass, honoring judges, lawyers, and others in the legal profession, were celebrated in Wichita last month. The White Mass is named for the white coats of physicians, although it honors all those who work in health care.

St. Cecilia Sing Nov. 18 at the ASC convent
All parish choirs, cantors, and instrumentalists – and their families and friends – are invited to attend the St. Cecilia Sing Sunday, Nov. 18, at the Adorers of the Blood of Christ Convent, 1165 Southwest Blvd., in Wichita.
The program begins at 2 p.m. and includes prayer, the life of St. Cecilia, choir performances, and congregational singing. An optional tour of the convent chapel will be conducted at 3:30 p.m. A reception begins at 4.
Reservations are requested. To do so email npmwichita.org by Nov. 13.

Veteran’s Day Mass at Pilsen Sunday, Nov. 11
A Veteran’s Day Mass will be celebrated Sunday, Nov. 11, at St. John Nepomucene Church in Pilsen, the hometown of Servant of God Father Emil Kapaun.
A wreath laying and lunch will follow the Mass.
All veterans and those currently serving in the armed forced are invited to the Father Kapaun Guild Veteran’s Day Celebration.

Barnes & Noble book fair Saturday, Nov. 10
The 11th Annual Barnes & Noble Book fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, to benefit nine Catholic schools in Wichita, Coffeyville, and Newton.
The event’s goal is to improve reading levels by providing new classroom and library books. At least 70 percent of the students in the benefitting schools receiving either free or reduced lunches and do not have the means to buy new library books.
To help the schools:
• Purchase a book at Barnes & Noble for the school library. Many books have already been chosen for the schools. The books will be delivered to the schools.
• Make a purchase and tell a cashier you are with the book fair. The school will receive a percentage of the sale from all sales, including coffee.
• Mail a check by Nov. 4 to any of the following schools or to the St. Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund, 424 N. Broadway, Wichita, KS 67202. Or donate on-line at https://give.CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org/pages/Drexel/book-donation
Participating Wichita schools are All Saints, Christ the King, Holy Savior, St. Anne, St. Joseph, St. Margaret Mary, St. Patrick; Holy Name, Coffeyville; and St. Mary, Newton.

Life is a little easier for Catholic Charities Adult Day Services clients now that they have use of a new, 24-passenger van.

Spiritual Life Center news, October 19, 2018

SLC’s next Dinner with the Doctors program Oct. 23
The faithful are invited to dinner and a presentation about Saint Teresa of Avila on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at the Spiritual Life Center.
The program, part of the Center’s “Dinner with the Doctors” series, includes a meal and pleasant conversation in the Main Assembly Room.
The cost for the evening is $15 per person. Dinner with the Doctors will be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23. Advance registration is highly encouraged. To register, visit SLCwichita.org.

Good Books book club to meet at the SLC beginning Nov. 8
The Spiritual Life Center will hold its first Good Books meeting of the fall on Thursday, Nov. 8, about Willa Cather’s The Scarlet Letter. The course meets monthly throughout the fall to learn more about the novel and how it relates to Christians.
Kapaun Mt. Carmel teacher Nate Arrida will lead the sessions which will take place on Nov. 8, Dec. 6, and Jan. 3. The study meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The cost for the course is $30 and the book will be available in the Center’s bookstore.
Please go to www.SLCWichita.org or call (316) 744-0167 to register. Pre-registration is requested, but walk-ins are welcome.

Weekend retreat with Saint Thérèse of Lisieux at SLC weekend of Nov. 9-11
A weekend retreat on Nov. 9-11 at the Spiritual Life Center will take participants on a journey through scripture with Saint Thérèse of Lisieux. Brother Joseph Schmidt will lead the weekend.
The “Little Flower,” as Saint Thérèse is often called, is one of the most popular saints of our time. Pope St. John Paul II wrote that her “little way” is nothing other than the gospel way of holiness for all.
During the retreat, Br. Joseph Schmidt, the author of the best-selling book “Everything Is Grace: The Life and Way of Thérèse of Lisieux,” helps retreatants understand Thérèse’s message through the Scripture passages that illuminated her insights about God and his merciful love.
Participants will be guided during the retreat to discover how their own relationship with the Lord might be transformed by the Little Way of St. Thérèse.
Weekend retreats at the SLC include five meals, all conferences, Mass and quiet prayer time. Brother Schmidt is a De LaSalle Christian Brother currently based in Philadelphia, he serves as a spiritual director, lecturer, and retreat master.
Want to participate?
Regular retreat pricing applies for the weekend. Register and pay by Oct. 29 to receive an early bird discount. All registrations include a $50 non-refundable deposit. Reservations can be made on line at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167. Please register in advance to ensure space and food quantities.

Final Parent U of the year at the SLC on engaging kids in the Mass set for Oct. 24
The Spiritual Life Center welcomes brothers Al Jirak, father of nine, and Fr. John Jirak, pastor of Church of the Magdalen, for a course called “Engaging Kids in the Mass.”
The Jirak brothers will bring two unique perspectives to the final Parent U class of the year on Oct. 24.
The class will include advice, experiential knowledge, and discussion on how to help your children engage more deeply in the Mass. Parents of children newborn to 18 years old are welcome to enjoy this evening course that takes place from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Want to sign up?
Learn more about this topic and tactics towards better parenting on Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita. Registration may be found at www.SLCWichita.org. The cost is $10 which includes the program and refreshments.

Scout Day of Reflection Nov. 17 at the SLC
The Catholic Committee on Scouting is hosting a Day of Reflection Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The day is for youth currently working on these religious emblems: Ad Atare Dei, Marian Medal, or Spirit Alive.
The day begins at 8 a.m. with Mass followed by registration at 8:45 a.m. It concludes at 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for youth and adults, to help cover lunch. Preregister by contacting Kathy Petr at kpetr@cox.net or at 686-7893.
The Catholic Committee on Scouting works with all youth who belong to Cub or Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little Flowers, and American Heritage Girls.

Youth and school news, October 19, 2018

KMC play Oct. 19-20
The comedy in three acts “You Can’t Take It With You!” will be performed at 7 p.m. Friday through Saturday, Oct. 19-20, in the theater of Kapaun Mt. Carmel High School in Wichita.
Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students.

Magdalen school named Blue Ribbon national award winner
Church of the Magdalen Catholic School recently received a 2018 National Blue Ribbon award.
The U.S. Department of Education has bestowed the award over the past 36 years to America’s most successful public and non-public elementary, middle, and high schools. Magdalen Catholic School will join the list of 349 schools across the U.S. recognized for overall academic performance or progress in closing the achievement gaps by U.S. Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos.
The Council for American Private Education nominates non-public schools, including parochial and independent schools, if their student achievement in English and mathematics is among the top 15 percent in the country.
The National Blue Ribbon flag-waving overhead a school has become a trademark of excellence, a symbol of quality recognized by everyone from parents to policy-makers in thousands of communities.
Janet Eaton, superintendent of Catholic Schools for the Diocese of Wichita, said: “We are thrilled that Magdalen Catholic School, led by Principal Kristin Schmitz and Fr. John Jirak, is being recognized as a 2018 Blue Ribbon School.
“This distinguished award speaks volumes to the exemplary Catholic education offered at this school. We are extremely proud of the staff, students, and the entire Magdalen parish.”

Barnes & Noble book fair Saturday, Nov. 10
The 11th Annual Barnes & Noble Book fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, to benefit nine Catholic schools in Wichita, Coffeyville, and Newton.
The event’s goal is to improve reading levels by providing new classroom and library books. At least 70 percent of the students in the benefitting schools receiving either free or reduced lunches and do not have the means to buy new library books.
To help the schools:
• Purchase a book at Barnes & Noble for the school library. Many books have already been chosen for the schools. The books will be delivered to the schools.
• Make a purchase and tell a cashier you are with the book fair. The school will receive a percentage of the sale from all sales, including coffee.
• Mail a check by Nov. 4 to any of the following schools or to the St. Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund, 424 N. Broadway, Wichita, KS 67202. Or donate on-line at https://give.CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org/pages/Drexel/book-donation
Participating Wichita schools are All Saints, Christ the King, Holy Savior, St. Anne, St. Joseph, St. Margaret Mary, St. Patrick; Holy Name, Coffeyville; and St. Mary, Newton.

Scout Day of Reflection Nov. 17 at the SLC
The Catholic Committee on Scouting is hosting a Day of Reflection Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The day is for youth currently working on these religious emblems: Ad Atare Dei, Marian Medal, or Spirit Alive.
The day begins at 8 a.m. with Mass followed by registration at 8:45 a.m. It concludes at 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for youth and adults, to help cover lunch. Preregister by contacting Kathy Petr at kpetr@cox.net or at 686-7893.
The Catholic Committee on Scouting works with all youth who belong to Cub or Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little Flowers, and American Heritage Girls.

Diocese mourns the passing of Bishop Gerber

Many years ago, Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber asked that this photo be used as part of his obituary. It reflects his connection to the land and him walking into the light. (Courtesy photo)

Services for Bishop Gerber Monday and Tuesday
Bishop Emeritus Eugene J. Gerber, the eighth bishop of the Diocese of Wichita died Saturday, Sept. 29, in Wichita. He was 87.
He was bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City from 1976 to 1982, when he was named the ordinary of the Diocese of Wichita. Bishop Gerber retired in 2001.
Open-casket viewing will be available after the noon Mass Monday, Oct. 8, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita. Viewing begins at 1:30 p.m. and concludes at 6 p.m. An all-night vigil begins with solemn vespers at 6:30 p.m. A rosary will be prayed at 8:30 p.m. Viewing and visitation will be possible until 9 a.m. Tuesday.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Cathedral. Interment will be at 2:30 p.m. at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita.

Born in Kingman
Eugene John Gerber was born at a hospital in Kingman, Kansas, on April 30, 1931, to Cornelius and Lena Tiesmeyer Gerber. They lived on a farm at Waterloo about 10 miles east of Kingman. He was the fourth of seven children.
Two days after his birth, on May 1, Eugene was taken to St. Louis Church in Waterloo, where Father Bernard Garmann baptized him.
He graduated from St. Louis School in Waterloo, a school staffed by Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother. Eugene began high school studies in the fall of 1945 at Conception Seminary in Conception, Missouri. As the result of a football injury, he returned home and finished his high school education at Kingman High School where he graduated in 1949.

First studied at Conception
After a year at Wichita University, he began studies for the priesthood at Conception Seminary in Conception, Missouri, and continued at St. Thomas Seminary in Denver. He was ordained on May 19, 1959, at St. Patrick Church in Kingman by Bishop Mark K. Carroll.
He served St. Anne and Church of the Magdalen parishes in Wichita before being named vice chancellor in 1961. Father Gerber taught religion at Mt. Carmel Academy from 1961 to 1963 when he was named an assistant at Holy Savior Parish in Wichita.
He returned to the Chancery in 1963 as vice chancellor. The next year was named an assistant to St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, Wichita, and as assistant to Bishop David M. Maloney. Father Gerber was once again named vice chancellor in 1965.

Worked for the Catholic Advance
He served as business manager for the Catholic Advance beginning in 1967 and was named an assistant at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception the next year.
In 1973 Father Gerber was named pastor of Church of the Blessed Sacrament in Wichita. He was named chancellor in 1975 while continuing as pastor of Blessed Sacrament.
Several months after his appointment as chancellor in 1975, Bishop David M. Maloney announced that Father Gerber had been assigned to post-graduate studies in theology and scripture at the St. Thomas Pontifical University in Rome, known as the Angelicum. Father Gerber returned to Wichita in February 1976, after receiving a licentiate in theology.

Named bishop of Dodge City
He was 45 years of age when he was appointed to serve as the third bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City. Bishop Gerber was ordained to the episcopacy on Dec. 14, 1976, by Bishop David Maloney at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita. The following day, installation ceremonies were held in the Civic Center in Dodge City. Bishop Gerber was the first native of Kansas to lead the Dodge City diocese.
Named bishop of Wichita
On Nov. 23, 1982, after six years in Dodge City, Bishop Gerber was appointed to lead the Diocese of Wichita. He was installed Feb. 9, 1983, at Century II in Wichita.
Bishop Gerber is best known for his oversight of the stewardship way of life in the diocese, the establishment of The Lord’s Diner, a food ministry founded on Feb. 14, 2002, that has served nearly 5 million meals to the poor.

Cathedral services include all-night vigil

An open-casket viewing will be available after the noon Mass Monday, Oct. 8, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
• Viewing begins at 1:30 p.m. and concludes at 6 p.m.
• An all-night vigil begins with solemn vespers at 6:30 p.m.
• A rosary will be prayed at 8:30 p.m.
• Viewing and visitation will be possible until 9 a.m. Tuesday.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Cathedral. Interment will be at 2:30 p.m. at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita.

A Bishop Gerber photo gallery

Bishop Emeritus Gerber delivers a homily on Christmas Eve in 2013 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
Bishop Gerber speaks at a Mass on All Souls Day, Nov. 2, 2013, at Ascension Cemetery, where he will be buried on Tuesday.
Bishop Gerber poses with babies on his cathedra.
Bishop Gerber talks to one of his young sheep on her birthday.
Bishop Gerber participates in the ground-breaking of The Lord’s Diner, one of his many legacies. (Advance and courtesy photos)
Bishop Gerber loved to play golf with his priests and his flock.
Bishop Eugene J. Gerber visits Pope John Paul II in this undated photo with two priests who would become bishops. At left is Father James Conley, now bishop of the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska, and at right is Father Shawn McKnight, now bishop of the Diocese of Jefferson City, Missouri.
Bishop Gerber speaks to the confirmandi during a Confirmation service at Eck Stadium in Wichita in 1997, the Year of the Holy Spirit. (Advance photo)