Strong families required to build solid foundation for our culture, says speaker

To fix our culture we need to fix our families – one family at a time, according to the Rev. Mr. Harold Sivers, a permanent deacon of the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon.
Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, a frequent EWTN guest and featured presenter at the World Meeting of Families is the keynote speaker at the Faith and Family Festival scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 10, at St. Peter the Apostle Parish in Schulte. His talk is titled “Family, the Heart of Love and Mercy.”
“I’m going to be sharing personal stories about my own family growing up and how marriage and family life today is truly the foundation for this future of the church,” he said last week in a telephone interview.
“St. John Paul II called the family the domestic church of the home and we need to start to think and act like a church…we can take this culture back but we have to do it one family at a time.”
A family must be built on a strong foundation, he said.
“If we’re serious about moving forward in our family, keeping our children in the church, having a marriage that’s really alive…having a vibrant marriage, conferences like this are very important,” he said.
The Faith and Family Festival will help families to gather as one family in Christ to learn how to grow in the faith so that they can then enliven the culture with the beauty and truth of our Catholic faith, Deacon Sivers said.
The culture is facing many challenges to authentic Christian marriage and life.
“A conference like this is so important to bring us back to focus and center on Jesus Christ, who is the heart of the marriage, the heart of family life. An intimate, personal, loving and life-giving communion with the personal God is exactly what I think needs to happen in the world today.”
The church has been on the defense too long, Deacon Sivers said, adding that parents are abdicating their roles as the spiritual leaders of the home to others.
“And so what is happening is our young people are learning about Jesus…but then they find out how that is actually lived out every day in the home: parents aren’t praying together, they’re not praying with the families, they’re not going to church, they’re not actually living the faith that the young people are learning.”
That results in a disconnect between learning their faith and living it.
“That is a gap that we need to close if we are to live a truly Catholic family life,” he said. “Be more on the offense and witness boldly and unashamedly to our faith and to Jesus Christ.”

3,500 attend MCFC 2016

Kevin Regan’s voice was tattered after this year’s Midwest Catholic Family Conference, but he was able to communicate that he was happy with the event.
About 3,500 attended the 17th annual event Aug. 5-7 at Century II in Wichita, he said, a decrease from the year before. Last year’s numbers were above average because of a concert in 2015 that brought in 750 people on one night alone.
“We have tremendous support from Bishop Kemme and a lot of pastors,” Regan said, but there are still many Catholics in the diocese who haven’t learned how valuable the event can be to their faith and to their families.
“It was a great conference and we’ll continue to reach out and try to stay fresh,” he said.
The conference is negotiating with several big Catholic names for next year’s event, Regan said, adding that they are planning a “huge line-up” next year, although he can’t be specific – yet.
He challenged the regular attendees to keep the conference in the black by sharing their experience of this year’s conference and remembering to invite them to next year’s event.

Tim Staples, a perennial favorite
One of the speakers, Tim Staples has attended every conference except one. He is a perennial favorite and this year talked about gnosticism.
Staples, the director of Apologetics and Evangelization at Catholic Answers, talked about the heretic Cerinthus who denied that God made the physical world and that Jesus was divine.
In the Gospel of John, Jesus reveals himself as the great “I am,” Staples explained to a crowd of several hundred on the south end of Expo Hall. “When he uses those words…the Jews knew exactly what he was doing. John emphasizes the divinity of Christ because of the Cerinthus heresy.”
Because gnosticism held that matter is evil, Staples said Cerinthus taught that marriage was evil because it resulted in flesh – children. As a result of that belief, Cerinthus said the Eucharist couldn’t be the body, blood, soul, and divinity of the Lord.
The Order of Preachers, the Dominicans, were formed to address a similar heresy, Albigensianism, he said, adding that the heresy advanced the idea that Christ couldn’t be God because he took flesh upon himself.
Staples also talked about Martin Luther, his errors regarding the Mass, the Real Presence in the Eucharist, and Luther’s belief in “faith alone.”
A former Baptist, Staples said when he became Catholic he went to Mass to see the truth of the Eucharist.
“I am about to see the greatest miracle in the universe,” he said. “Father won’t be holding bread anymore, he’s going to be holding Jesus.”
He said as he looked around the church, no one else was as excited as he was.
“Our minds must be attuned to the Eucharist,” he said. “It is Jesus giving himself to us.”
Luther was wrong about the Eucharist, Staples said. “We must commit ourselves and understand that when we go to Mass today…we are being called to lay our lives down for Christ and that Christ will take us and transform us to him.”

Leo Severino
Leo Severino talked about the purpose of life and how Hollywood undermines that purpose in his talk.
Severino, an attorney and partner and producer for Metanoia Films, talked about how rampant relativism, the idea that truth is relative, pervades Hollywood.
He said his search for truth led him to study philosophy and ultimately to the Catholic Church.
“We can know God through reason,” he said. “This can lead to a purpose in life.”
Severino said Hollywood may not deny that God exists, but that many believe God has nothing do to with us. Relativism and nihilism, the belief that life is meaningless, are rampant in Hollywood, he said, adding that Hollywood’s dead-end belief is: “Only what benefits you or pleasures you is what matters.”
Life is not meaningless, he said.
“We have the ability to know and love,” Severino said. “Know and love what? We are called to know and to love God!”

Jennifer Fulwiler
Jennifer Fulwiler, a former atheist born into an atheistic family, talked Saturday about her journey to the truth of the Catholic Church that started with her falling in love with a highly-educated “guy who believed in God.”
She said it was clear that he wasn’t a practicing Christian, but that she was shocked about his beliefs because she thought he was intelligent.
Fulwiler said her husband defended his beliefs by explaining to her that when he was baptized as a young man he “encountered someone.”
“I will never deny what I encountered at my baptism wasn’t real,” she said he told her.
Fulwiler said instead of being practicing Christians, they worshipped at the altar of their careers and money.
She and her husband were married at an unconventional wedding and about a year later she had a baby, which started her thinking about atheism again.
“To be connected to this world of babies was truly a shock to me,” she said. “I knew this worldview that the love I felt for this child … that it is nothing but chemical reactions in the brain … I knew that worldview was false. The love I experienced had some source external.”
It was then she realized she was no longer an atheist.
Fulwiler then shared her journey to Christianity, one that started with the Hallmark Channel, was sidetracked by Buddhism, and put back on track with an attempt at prayer.
After being drawn in a bookstore through grace to a book about Jesus Christ, she began perusing Christian websites. The bloggers who were able to “demolish” atheist arguments all had one thing in common, she said, they were Catholics.
“We were shocked when one point after another we found the church was right,” Fulwiler said. “I finally found the owner’s manual to being human,” and she started living the way the church taught she should live.
She and her husband both converted to Catholicism.
Fulwiler closed by discussing a genetic disorder she has and how God worked in her life.
“God wants to work in your life in real ways – even when the chips are down. You’ll never understand that until you first understand his mercy.”
Next year’s event is scheduled for Aug. 4-6. To receive updates “like” the Catholic Family Conference page on Facebook.

Pilgrims reflect; Pope sees hope in youth at World Youth Day

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — In a world traumatized by war, young people gathered for World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland, gave strong signs of hope and brotherhood, Pope Francis said.
World Youth Day was a “prophetic sign for Poland and Europe” and took on a “global dimension” in a world threatened by a war fought in pieces, the pope said Aug. 3 at his weekly general audience.
“Precisely in this world at war, we need brotherhood, we need closeness, we need dialogue, and we need friendship. And this is the sign of hope: when there is brotherhood,” he said.

Pilgrim reflections
Bishop Carl A. Kemme said it was a pleasure for him to join the pilgrims from the Diocese of Wichita in their journey to World Youth Day, his first.
“The days of our pilgrimage left me with a great sense of hope and enthusiasm because of the faith of millions of young people and young at heart from all over the world, united with Pope Francis for days of celebration, catechesis, and evangelization,” he said.
“I am very proud of our group and our leaders, as they endured quite a few hardships that are part and parcel of a pilgrimage.”
He thanked everyone who helped support the pilgrims with financial resources and, he said, most importantly, prayers.
“I am confident we have all returned to our homes, lives, and responsibilities with renewed faith. Pope Francis urged the young people there and all over the world ‘to leave their mark.’ I pray we will all do what the Lord inspires us to do in order to make our world a better and holier place.”
Other pilgrims from the Diocese of Wichita reflected on how WYD reflects the church.
“My favorite part of World Youth Day was meeting people from all over the world,” said Marie O’Neal, a member of St. Joseph Parish in Wichita. “Pope Francis said to build bridges, not walls, and once you were able to get past the obvious language barrier, the connections that we made are indescribable.
“Coming together with youth from all over the world and learning to celebrate our cultural differences while knowing that we were gathered together as a family of believers with Our Holy Father to learn how to know, love and serve our Lord more fully was the most beautiful experience I have ever been a part of.”
Michelle Pickert, a member of the Church of the Magdalen, Wichita, said it was a blessing to watch the diocesan youth transform during their two weeks in Poland.
“They constantly radiated joy, no matter if we were waiting in long lines or hiking in the heat. Their excitement for seeing Pope Francis and interacting with pilgrims from around the world was contagious. We had such an unforgettable experience.”
Crystal Nguyen, a member of St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Wichita, said she enjoyed being able to experience Polish history which is so rich in Catholicism.
“Being able to walk where saints have walked, as well as visiting and praying where they have lived has been incredibly inspiring. One of my favorite saints in John Paul II, so getting to venerate one of his relics and then a later visit to his hometown was an amazing opportunity.”

WYD 2019 in Panama
Panama will host World Youth Day in 2019. Although it is a small country, the head of its bishops’ conference has no doubts the church will be able to organize the event.
“Panama, with its canal, is a bridge between two continents, and we’ll also make it a symbolic bridge between young people, especially in Latin America,” said Cardinal Jose Lacunza Maestrojuan of David, Panama.
At a news conference in Krakow July 31, the cardinal said Panama was well-placed for air, road and sea communications with North and South America and would give the World Youth Day a distinctive character.
“We truly hope this will be a blessing for our country, placing it at the center of the whole world’s attention,” Cardinal Lacunza said.
Catholics traditionally make up three-quarters of the 3.3 million inhabitants of Panama.

Diocesan news, August 19, 2016

Seminarians take another step to ordination
Six aspirants for Candidacy for Holy Orders were accepted by Bishop Carl A. Kemme at a Mass Wednesday, Aug. 4, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
The seminarians accepted were Darren W. Beckham, James T. Buster, Hayden C. Charles, Luke A. Downing, Derek J. Hooper, and Ty D. Taylor.
The six candidates promised to complete their educations and formation to be prepared to assume ministry within the church, and to prepare in their minds and spirits to give faithful service to “Christ the Lord and his body, the church.”
Bishop Kemme told the men they must now continue their formation with the “attitude that the priesthood no longer seems a distant possibility, but a unique probability, if not a looming hope on the horizon of your lives.”
Do your best, he added. “Study hard. Pray daily. Be formed in every way into a man of God, a brother of Christ, a servant of the church.”
The dinner following Mass was hosted by the Downtown Serra Club of Wichita with special back-to-school gifts for all the seminarians.

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar.
Aug. 20: Holy Spirit Prayer and Healing Conference; Immaculate Heart of Mary Mass of Final Profession, Motherhouse
Aug. 22-23: Jesus Caritas
Aug. 25: Newman University Mass of Holy Spirit and Matriculation Ceremony
Aug. 26: School pastoral visit Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School
Aug. 27-28: Parish pastoral visit St. Joseph in Conway Springs
Sept. 7: StepStone Apartment ribbon cuttings and blessing
Sept. 8: Presbyteral Council
Sept. 9: School pastoral visit, St. Joseph in Conway Springs.
Sept. 10: Mass for Faith and Family Conference, St. Peter Schulte
Sept. 10-11: Parish pastoral visit St. Catherine of Siena, Wichita

Tournament Sept. 26 to benefit Carmelite nun monastery
The 9th Annual Benefit Golf Tournament sponsored by the Friends of the Carmelite Nuns will be held Monday, Sept. 26, at Willowbend Golf Club in Wichita.
Proceeds from the event will benefit the construction of a monastery chapel for the Discalced Carmelites located at 7445 N. Woodlawn in Valley Center, about four miles directly north of Church of the Resurrection.
The entry fee is $125 per player or $500 for a team and includes a sack lunch, green fees, a cart, on-course beverages, and hole competitions including a $10,000 hole-in-one prize. In addition to having a great time with some diocesan priests, participants will take part in an awards dinner.
Hole sponsors, priest sponsors, and prizes are being sought for the fundraiser. Those who wish to support the event may email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , or call 316-305-3051.
For more information about the nuns, see ad on page 4 of the print edition or visit CarmelOfWichita.com.

Justice for All offering pro-life workshops on Aug. 20, repeat Aug. 25
Justice for All is hosting two pro-life workshops, Aug. 20 and Aug. 25, at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, 645 N. 119th St. W., in Wichita.
The free workshop is designed to help those attending defend their pro-life stance.
The workshop will be offered from 8:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20. The same workshop will then be offered from 6:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 25.
A physician said last year: “I…have been active in the pro-life movement for 30 years. These are some of the most logically sound arguments, taught in a step wise manner that I have ever heard.”
To register, visit www.jfaweb.org/register or call Justice For All’s office at 316-683-6426.

Tennis tournament in October to benefit four Wichita schools
A Doubles Tennis Charity Tournament will be played from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4, to benefit four Catholic Schools in Wichita.
The tournament will be played at the Genesis Health Club, 1515 N. Rock Road. The cost is $50 per player or $100 per team. Refreshments will be served and prizes will be awarded.
Proceeds from the event will go toward books for the libraries of Holy Savior, St. Joseph, St. Margaret Mary, and St. Patrick Catholic schools.
The event is sponsored in part by Aces for Academics and the St. Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund.

Single adult Catholic retreat Sept. 10 at All Saints Parish in Wichita
Father H Setter will lead a retreat called “Sanctifying the Single Life” Saturday, Sept. 10, at All Saints Parish in Wichita. It is open to all adult single Catholics: for those who feel called to the single life as a permanent state, and those for whom it is a period of transition.
Father H said there are certain opportunities and challenges specific to the single life. The retreat is a chance for participants to reflect prayerfully on how to live out their Christian vocation in a way that more fully integrates their current state of life. Retreatants will be invited to reflect on topics such as vocation, sexuality, and their place in a modern and changing world.
“As our first call to holiness comes with baptism and follows from there throughout our life, this day is designed to give single individuals an opportunity to discern their continued call to holiness uniquely as a single person,” said Father Setter.
“Unlike some singles gatherings and events, this day in no way, shape or form is designed to entertain ‘matchmaking’ efforts or goals. Rather it is a day for the single individual to move deeper into their faith and spirituality.”
All Saints is located at 3205 E. Grand. Participants are invited to gather for Mass at the church at 8 a.m. The retreat will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch will be provided.
There is no cost for the retreat, but participants are asked to register by contacting Kristina Glicksman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 316-440-1718.

Father Van Haverbeke plans big stewardship ‘reveal’ next week
Home improvement television shows often end with a big “reveal.” Father Ken Van Haverbeke, director of the diocesan Office of Stewardship, is planning a big stewardship reveal for the Sept. 2 Catholic Advance.
Before the unveiling in two weeks, Father Ken Van Haverbeke, is teasing the faithful by announcing this year’s theme: “Stewarding our Gifts: Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life.”
This year’s theme plays with the English language, Father Van Haverbeke said. “We are making the noun ‘stewardship’ into a verb of action, ‘stewarding.’”
To become stewards of our gifts, he said, “We have to go to the school of stewardship – the Mass. It is there we learn to gratefully recognize, receive, and share what we have been given.”
The Eucharist is the source and summit of our faith, he said. “At the end of Mass we are sent out to glorify the Lord by our lives. To do that we must share what we have received.”
Sharing doesn’t mean to hand something and then walk away, Fr. Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke said. “We must also give a portion of ourselves. It’s easy to donate something without interacting, but sharing creates a relationship.”

Fr. Emil Kapaun honored at basilica in the Czech Republic
Father Emil Kapaun is becoming better known in his ancestral homeland.
On July 5, the feast of Saints Cyril and Methodius, Fr. Kapaun was remembered in Velehrad, Czech Republic. At the Basilica of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Velehrad, the Pearl Harbor Museum in Louka, Czech Republic, provided an exhibit on the life of Father Kapaun.
The display will have a permanent home in the museum if and when Fr. Kapaun is beatified. The exhibit also coincided with the meeting of the bishops of the Czech Republic both taking place at the Basilica of Saints Cyril and Methodius. The basilica is a national pilgrimage site in the Czech Republic.
The Pearl Harbor Museum in Louka has been built in honor of those who served in WWII. One wing of that museum has already been dedicated to Saint Pope John Paul II. Another wing will be dedicated to Fr. Kapaun if and when he is beatified.
Father John V. Hotze, episcopal delegate for the Office of Canonization of Father Emil Kapaun, asked the faithful to continue praying for his cause which is under consideration in Rome.

Struggling with same sex attractions?
Have you had these feelings for so long…keeping them hidden, afraid to speak out? Where do you go now?
The Diocese of Wichita offers spiritual support and fellowship for men and women with same sex attractions who are striving to live chaste lives.
Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or the Office of Marriage and Family Life at (316) 685-5240.

Three ‘last chance’ Masses now available
There are three “last chance” Sunday Masses in Wichita for those who hit the snooze button one too many times.
Newman University has one at 7 p.m. on Sundays now that the school year has begun.
The St. Paul University Parish at Wichita State University has a Saturday Vigil at 4:30 p.m. Sunday Masses are at 10 a.m. and at 7 and 9 p.m.

Catholic news websites
Two Catholic news aggregate websites are now available.
The two sites are NewAdvent.org and PewSitter.com.
The websites gather Catholic news stories from across the web and assemble them at one site.

The pope’s intentions
Here are Pope Francis’ prayer intentions for this month:
Sports: That sports may be an opportunity for friendly encounters between peoples and may contribute to peace in the world.
Living the Gospel: That Christians may live the Gospel, giving witness to faith, honesty, and love of neighbor.

Spiritual Life Center news, August 19, 2016

Understand Pope Francis better with a new book study Sept. 6 at the SLC
The Spiritual Life Center will host a book study of “The Betrothed,” by Alessandro Manzoni, beginning Tuesday, Sept. 6. The book is a personal favorite of Pope Francis. Some have said that much of his theological perspectives and pastoral priorities are best interpreted in light of the book.
The reading group, which is part of a new SLC education series called “Good Books,” begins on Tuesday, Sept. 6, with sessions meeting from 7 to 9 p.m.
The curriculum is based on the ideas of John Senior, founding father and leading professor of the famed Integrated Humanities Program, which throve at the University of Kansas in the 1970s and ’80s and helped form and inspire the young minds of many notable students such as Archbishop Paul Coakley, Bishop James Conley, and several of the founding monks of the Clear Creek Monastery in Oklahoma.
Senior says the great books movement of the 20th century “went flat” like “good champagne in plastic bottles.” According to Senior, “the seeds are good, but the cultural soil has been depleted.” What we really need, he says, is a sort of pre-education in literature that might not reach the highest levels of intellectual accomplishment the world has, but which is the necessary foundation for all further learning, either applied or speculative.
“Western tradition has given us the thousand good books as a preparation for the great ones- and for the all the studies in the arts and sciences. Without them, all studies are inhumane,” he writes in The Death of Christian Culture.
The book study begins Sept. 6 and continues at 7 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month. Discussion, oral readings, opinions, critiques, commentaries, questions and answers are on the agenda for the informal gatherings. There is no fee for attendance. The only cost will be for the optional purchase of textbooks and freewill donations for refreshments and hospitality.
Copies of selected books will be available at Monk’s Corner at the SLC. The reading schedule for “The Betrothed” is at the SLC web site.

Four-part series on Catholic money management for anyone starts in September at the SLC, Wichita
The SLC will offer a four-part course this fall to help the faithful learn the steps to financial freedom using the three theological virtues.
Catholic Money Management will be presented by Randy Walker, a St. Francis of Assisi parishioner. On four consecutive Tuesday evenings, Walker will teach participants ways to use faith, hope, and love to guide financial decisions and actions.
The group study is for everyone. It can benefit those who are doing fine financially, those who are surviving day-to-day, and those who have encountered some hardships and are struggling to know how to get out of the resulting debt.
Topics addressed over the four-week course include spending, budgeting, net worth, debt management and resolution, insurance, savings and investments, and end of life planning.
All of these are discussed in the context of God’s plan of stewardship and all in a non-commercial manner.
Classes will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Spiritual Life Center. The fall session meets Sept. 6, 13, 20, and 27.
There is no charge for this class. Free-will donations will be accepted, but are not necessary.
Participants may pre-register by calling the center at 316-744-0167 or online at www.SLCwichita.org.

‘Walking Your Children Back to Church’ Aug. 23-24 at the SLC in Wichita
Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke will address the heart-troubling topic of why so many family members and friends have left the Catholic faith later this month.
The program offers two opportunities for attendance. The one-evening program can be attended on Tuesday, Aug. 23, or Wednesday, Aug. 24. Both evenings run from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Father Ken Van Haverbeke will use encouragement from scripture and the saints to give practical advice to attendees.
Want to attend?
The cost is $10 for either evening. Visit www.SLCWichita.org or call (316) 744-0167 to register. Pre-registration is requested but walk-ins are welcome.

SLC Fall Theology Institute begins Saturday, Sept. 17
It isn’t too late to register for the Spiritual Life Center’s Fall Theology Institute.
Students participate in four courses this fall, each presented in three parts on Sept. 17, Nov. 5, and Dec. 10. Students may begin the two-year program at any time, and are welcome to join for any individual semester, with no obligation to complete the full two-year program.
The 2016 fall semester will contain four courses: “Morality: From Slaves to Sons: Liberty and Responsibility as commanded by the Decalogue,” “Scripture: Introduction to the New Testament,” “Praying with St. Ignatius of Loyola,” and “Church History: Theses, Councils, and Telescopes - The Church from 1500-1700.”
Want to enroll?
Class sessions will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on three Saturdays: Sept. 17, Nov. 5, and Dec. 10. The $75 registration fee covers all three class sessions and lunch. Registration may be made by calling the center at 744-0167 or online at SLCWichita.org.

Series on the prophets Aug. 30-Sept. 1 at SLC
Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke will discuss the prophets of the Old Testament and why they are important on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings, Aug. 30 to Sept. 1.
Participants will study the words from Old Testament prophets and learn what God might be saying to them today through the ancient scripts.
The program will be presented from 7 to 9 p.m. Registration is $10 per evening or $30 total. To register, visit the Spiritual Life Center’s webpage at www.SLCwichita.org or by calling 316-744-0167.

Diocesan news, August 5, 2016

Midwest Catholic Family Conference begins tonight
The 17th Annual Midwest Catholic Family Conference will be held Friday through Sunday, Aug. 5-7, at Century II in Wichita.
The young adult program, targeting youth adults 18 to 34, takes place Friday and Saturday evenings around 9 or 9:30 at the Hyatt. This year musician Marie Miller will perform one night and Jennifer Fulwiler the other night.
This year’s speakers include Fr. Charles Sikorsky, Jennifer Fulwiler, Leah Darrow, Leo Severino, and many more. Besides the speakers, the conference has a lot to offer to all ages, including prayer, Mass, and many booths reflecting a variety of Catholic ministries.
Registration and more information about the speakers and programs is available online at www.CatholicFamilyConference.org.

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar.
Aug. 4-5: Vietnamese Marian Days, Carthage, Missouri
Aug. 6-7: Midwest Catholic Family Conference, Wichita
Aug. 14: General Congreso closing Mass
Aug. 20: Holy Spirit Prayer and Healing Conference; Immaculate Heart of Mary Mass of Final Profession, St. Mark’s
Aug. 22-23: Jesus Caritas
Aug. 25: School pastoral visit, Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School
Aug. 27-28: Parish pastoral visit St. Joseph in Conway Springs

Curtis Martin to speak at Salina men’s conference Aug. 13
The founder and chief executive officer of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students, Curtis Martin, will speak at the Diocese of Salina’s Men’s Conference Saturday, Aug. 13, at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Hays.
Registration is $35 for adults and $15 for high school and college students. Father and son registration options are available. To register visit SalinaDiocese.org/family-life.
Martin co-hosts EWTN’s show, “Crossing the Goal” and is the vice-chairman of the Augustine Institute in Denver, a Catholic graduate school dedicated to the New Evangelization. He and his wife Michaelann live in Westminster, Colorado, with five of their nine children.

Date Night barbecue Aug. 10 at Magdalen
The next Date Night will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10, in the parish hall at Church of the Magdalen in Wichita.
Barbecue by Hog Wild and related fixin’s will be served followed by a talk by former Magdalen parishioners Jim and Melissa Beckett.
The cost is $30 per couple. For tickets visit DateNightBBQ.event brite.com. Participants will be eligible to win a date night grand prize.
Childcare will be provided free. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
The event is sponsored by the diocesan Office of Marriage and Family Life and Church of the Magdalen.

Tournament Sept. 26 to benefit Carmelite nun monastery
The 9th Annual Benefit Golf Tournament sponsored by the Friends of the Carmelite Nuns will be held Monday, Sept. 26, at Willowbend Golf Club in Wichita.
Proceeds from the event will benefit the construction of a monastery chapel for the Discalced Carmelites located at 7445 N. Woodlawn in Valley Center, about four miles directly north of Church of the Resurrection.
The entry fee is $125 per player or $500 for a team and includes a sack lunch, green fees, a cart, on-course beverages, and hole competitions including a $10,000 hole-in-one prize. In addition to having a great time with some diocesan priests, participants will take part in an awards dinner.
Hole sponsors, priest sponsors, and prizes are being sought for the fundraiser. Those who wish to support the event may email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , or call 316-305-3051.
For more information about the nuns, visit CarmelOfWichita.com.

Bergkamp to be remembered at softball classic Aug. 7
The Seventh Annual Chaplain Kapaun Classic softball game will be played Sunday, Aug. 7, at the St. Mark’s Parish ball field, behind the school, southeast of the church at 19001 W. 29th St. N in Colwich.
The event is in memory of Brian Bergkamp, a seminarian who drowned July 9 after rescuing a fellow kayaker.
The game brings together young people ages 18-35 to a fun event at the end of the summer to make new connections while raising funds for a local cause.
The classic will begin at 3 p.m. with Holy Hour and confessions at St. Mark’s Church, followed by softball from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. The evening will end with a picnic dinner in the parish hall beginning around 7 p.m.
“The softball game is a great time to connect and reflect at the end of the summer and the beginning of a new school year,” said Deacon Clay Kimbro. “It is wonderful to pray and play together while simply having a great time.”
Last year’s game was attended by over 250 young adults and raised over $8,000 for the Katharine Drexel Catholic School Fund. The beneficiary this year is A Better Choice, a Catholic pregnancy resource center located in east Wichita. The goal for this year is to raise $10,000. No sign-up or registration is needed, just bring a glove.
“This year we will remember our friend Brian Bergkamp in a particular way,” said Deacon Kimbro. “Brian made the donations box for the tournament and was a regular participant, so we wish to honor his joyful and playful spirit with a great time of fun and friendship!”

Apache mission to benefit from fundraiser
A fundraiser for the St. Joseph Apache Mission in Mescalero, New Mexico, will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Mid-America All Indian Center in Wichita.
Hatch green chile appetizers, fry bread, Apache stew, and barbecue will be served. Beverages are complimentary. Tickets are $35 at the door. Proceeds will benefit the mission and local efforts.

Spiritual Life Center news, August 5, 2016

SLC to host Carmelite Spirituality Retreat Aug. 12-14
People are drawn to a particular saint, a Gospel reading, or a particular church because of their spirituality. Everyone has a unique spirit, or spirituality.
The Spiritual Life Center will host Father Adam Gonzales of the El Carmelo Retreat House in Redlands, California, Friday through Sunday, Aug. 12-14, to help retreatants experience Carmelite spirituality.
The Carmelite spirituality is characterized by an intense thirst for an immediate and direct experience of God. It is centered on prayer, understood as loving friendship with God, and experienced as contemplation as the free gift of God. Carmelite spirituality is focused on attention to one’s relationship with Jesus.
Carmelites trace their roots and their name to Mount Carmel in the Holy Land. There, in the 13th century, a band of European men gathered together to live a simple life of prayer and witness to the Good News of Jesus Christ.
Their first chapel was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. They called themselves the Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel.
In the 16th century in Spain, St. Teresa of Avila renewed the Carmelite Order. With St. John of the Cross, she strengthened the order’s commitment to follow Christ through an intense life of prayer for the good of all the church.
For more information go to www.SLCWichita.org or call the Spiritual Life Center at (316) 744-0167. Check-in begins Friday, Aug. 12, at 6:30 p.m. with the first presentation at 7:30 p.m. The retreat concludes Sunday, Aug. 14, at 1 p.m. Register by Monday, Aug. 8.

Docentium Aug. 18 at the SLC
When Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI beatified John Henry Newman in September of 2010, local author Stephanie A. Mann said, “Something changed about the way Catholics should view this great nineteenth century writer and intellectual. Blessed John Henry Newman is an intercessor and a heavenly patron now, not just an academic interest and research project.”
In the decades after his death in the late nineteenth, his Cause for Canonization moved slowly, Mann said, but one reason some Catholics believed Newman should be canonized was his influence on others to become Catholic, both in his lifetime and for more than a century after his death. “Some even thought those conversions should be considered the miracles needed for his canonization,” Mann commented.
While Newman has had tremendous influence among converts, his own family rejected Catholicism entirely, and his brothers might even be said to have rejected orthodox, Trinitarian Christianity, in spite of his efforts. His equals in the Oxford Movement, E.B. Pusey and John Keble, didn’t follow his example but remained Anglicans.
Why did someone so persuasive fail within his own close family and friends? What does Newman’s failure mean for those of us whose family and friends have fallen away from Jesus and His Church?
Stephanie A. Mann will explore this aspect of Newman’s life and legacy as part of the Docentium series at the Spiritual Life Center on Thursday, Aug. 18. “Blessed John Henry Newman is a model for us of how to follow Jesus and to reach out to others to follow Him too, despite the cost, difficulty, or failure,” Mann concluded.
To register for the presentation, contact the Spiritual Life Center at 316-744-0167 or register online.

SLC Fall Theology Institute begins Sept. 17
The Spiritual Life Center will offer a three-part class this fall as part of its two-year curriculum in religious studies.
Students will participate in four courses this fall, each presented in three parts on Sept. 17, Nov. 5, and Dec. 10. Students may begin the two-year program at any time, and are welcome to join for any individual semester, with no obligation to complete the full two-year program.
The 2016 fall semester will contain four courses:
• Dusty Gates will teach “Morality: From Slaves to Sons: Liberty and Responsibility as commanded by the Decalogue.” The course will focus on commandments four through ten, governing the ways in which we relate to one another as children of God. Gates said that modern misconceptions of liberty tend to confuse liberty with license, resulting in an egocentric perspective of ethics, which the results in moral subjectivism and disintegrates into nihilism.
The classical understanding of law, Gates adds, maintains that human flourishing comes only through authentic liberty in which a person is truly free only when he understands and acts upon his responsibilities. Participants will discuss topics such as obedience, chastity, abortion, just war theory, the death penalty, and economic justice.
• Dr. David Wall will lead a class entitled, “Scripture: Introduction to the New Testament - Part 1.” In the course, students will gain a good framework of the New Testament, upon which they can continue to build knowledge and appreciation of its treasures. He will discuss its composition, canonization, genre, and some key insights from the each facet of the four-fold Gospel.
• The Prayer class for this semester is “Praying with St. Ignatius of Loyola” taught by Sr. Mary Ann Kirkland. The course will cover the 14 rules for discernment from the first week of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola and the examen prayer.
• The other class presented each Saturday of the semester will be “Church History: Theses, Councils, and Telescopes - The Church from 1500-1700.”
Dr. Joshua Papsdorf will guide students through a study of the church’s engagement with the Protestant reformers, the Council of Trent, and the relationship between the church and the first scientists. While the events took place centuries ago, a proper understanding of them will shed light on crucial issues confronting Catholics today.
Want to enroll?
Class sessions will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on three Saturdays: Sept. 17, Nov. 5, and Dec. 10. The $75 registration fee covers all three class sessions and lunch. Registration may be made by calling the center at 744-0167 or online at SLCWichita.org.

‘Walking Your Children Back to Church’ Aug. 23-24 at the SLC
Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke will address the heart-troubling topic of why so many family members and friends have left the Catholic faith later this month.
The program offers two opportunities for attendance. The one-evening program can be attended on Tuesday, Aug. 23, or Wednesday, Aug. 24. Both evenings run from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Father Ken Van Haverbeke will use encouragement from Scripture and the saints to give practical advice to attendees.
Want to attend? Cost is $10 for either evening. Please go to www.SLCWichita.org or call (316) 744-0167 to register. Pre-registration is requested but walkins are welcome.

Monthly Mass with Children at the SLC on Aug. 18
Caregivers and their children are invited to the monthly “KidsPrayToo!: Mass with Children” at the Spiritual Life Center on Thursday, Aug. 18.
The Mass begins at 11:15 a.m. at which Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke will speak especially to the littlest among us. This program gives parents and caregivers an opportunity to teach their children without worrying about disturbing other Mass-goers around them.
All families are invited to pack a lunch to enjoy in the courtyard. Families may wish to bring a picnic blanket for lunch on the grass. Registration is not necessary.

Congregation of St. Joseph jubilarians mark 1,430 years

The Congregation of St. Joseph, Wichita Center, honored 22 members of the Congregation during a jubilee celebration Saturday, June 18, at Mt. St. Mary’s Convent in Wichita.
The jubilarians:
80 years – Sister Sedonia Isenbart
75 years – Sisters Paula Marie Metz, Julita Paulie, and Charlotte Zelenak
70 years – Sisters Jane Aucoin, Veronice Born, Patricia Brandner, Jean Louise Diskin, Elizabeth Ann Engels, Virginita Hearing, Patrice Joyce, and Rosina Van Leeuwen;
60 years – Sisters Antonella Bayer, Cecilia Okada, Fidel Marie Sauceda, Judith Ann Shimek, Joann Schneider, Catherine Switlik, Elizabeth Ann Switlik, Mary Margaret Switlik, and Mary Virginia Watanabe
25 years – Sister Karen Salsbery
Collectively the 22 Sisters have served the people of God for 1,430 years. Sisters Cecilia Okada and Mary Virginia Watanabe live in Japan and celebrated there.
The festivities began with picture taking. After a short break, a Mass was offered celebrating the Sisters’ years of service. The Most Rev. Carl A. Kemme was the main celebrant and Fr. Joseph Gile, chaplain at Mt. St. Mary’s Convent, concelebrated. The celebration concluded with a dinner shared with the jubilarians’ fellow sisters, Bishop Kemme, and Fr. Gile.

Parish Leadership Institute July 23

The reaction of one parishioner from Holy Cross Parish in Hutchinson after last year’s Parish Leadership Institute was: “Wow! What a great day! I only wish it was longer!”
This year’s institute will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 23, at the Spiritual Life Center.
Parish leadership can be complicated. Pastors are often reluctant to ask parishioners to participate in parish leadership positions because they realize the busy lives parishioners lead. Parishioners are reluctant to accept this act of stewardship as a leader in their parish because they do not feel formed well enough to accept.
The Parish Leadership Institute is designed to uncomplicate the task of parish leaders who participate in pastoral councils, finance councils, stewardship councils, parish and school staffs, and other parish organizations.
The Institute consists of general leadership sessions and specific council sessions. Ed O’Malley, a parishioner of Blessed Sacrament Parish and president of the Kansas Leadership Institute, will give the key note address about how leadership is an activity, not a position.
Father Ken Van Haverbeke, director of Stewardship, will present the history of the Diocese of Wichita, the organization and structure of the diocese, and some spiritual vices and virtues of leadership.
Jim Rundell, program coordinator of the St. Dismas Ministry to the Incarcerated and administrator of the Spiritual Life Center, will also speak about parish planning.
“Parish planning is a prayerful process that provides a vehicle, or a structure for sharing our gifts within our worshipping community,” Rundell said. “A parish plan provides an opportunity to share our individual gifts in a cohesive manner resulting in a strong community response to God’s call to discipleship.”
Workshops will include, Parish Council Formation led by Father Ken Van Haverbeke for pastoral council members and other ministry councils; Parish Finance Formation led by Bryan Coulter and Therese Seiler for parish finance councils and ministry group financial officers; Stewardship Formation led by Audrey Ronnfeldt for stewardship council members and volunteer coordinators.
Topics covered in the day’s formation at the Spiritual Life Center will include best practice ideas, conflict resolution, working with different pastors and leaders. Mass and lunch are included as part of the day.

Want to participate?
To register for the Parish Leadership Institute, visit www.SLCwichita.org, call 316-744-0167, or contact your pastor and say, “I really would like to go to this!” The cost is $20 per person, with an additional $30 suggested donation if staying overnight, but no one will be turned down due to lack of funds.

World-renowned theologian to visit Wichita, Chanute next month

Petroc Willey will speak at Summer Catechetical Summit Aug. 20-21
Dr. Petroc Willey said he will explore the Eucharist during his presentations at the Summer Catechetical Summit next month.
“What more central point of the faith could there be to explore together,” he said in a telephone interview last week.
Dr. Willey, a world-renowned theologian, will speak at the Summit Saturday, Aug. 20 at Kapaun Mt. Carmel High School in Wichita, and at St. Patrick Parish in Chanute the next day.
“My particular contribution will be to look at what I call the pedagogy of the catechism with regards to how it presents the Eucharist and the faith in general,” he said.
“The catechism, I think, is widely understood to be a definitive volume for holding for us, in a very secure way, the content for our faith for our time. And one of the things that is slightly less well appreciated is that it not only holds it, but it also presents it to us in a catechetical way.”
The word pedagogy means the method and practice of teaching.
Dr. Willey said he would like to explore the pedagogy that is found in the catechism and how it presents the central mystery of the faith, the Eucharist, “which is described as the sum and summary of our faith.”
The way the Eucharist is presented, he added, sums up the pedagogy of the catechism as well. “I’d like to look at that because understanding that better can be of benefit to us whichever programs we’re using, whatever age groups we’re teaching, whatever setting we’re in.”
A convert to Catholicism, Dr. Willey has earned two Ph.Ds, one of them from the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome, and a licentiate in sacred theology. He is a world renowned authority on catechesis, the former director of Maryvale Institute in Birmingham, England, and is currently a professor of Catechetics at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, Ohio. He serves the Holy Father as consultor for the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization.
Jose Gonzalez, of the Sophia Institute for Teachers, based in Manchester, New Hampshire, will also make a presentation at the Wichita summit about resources, lessons plans, and activity ideas useful in teaching about the sacraments.
Those attending the Wichita summit will have the opportunity to attend several break-out sessions, collaborate, and view materials from publishers. The Wichita summit will conclude with a Vigil Mass celebrated by Father Dan Lorimer, chaplain at Kapaun Mt. Carmel.
All parish catechetical leaders, youth ministry leaders and teams, catechists and aides are highly encouraged to attend. Catholic school teachers and parents are also welcome to attend.
The summit at St. Patrick Parish in Chanute will have fewer break-out sessions and will be without Jose Gonzalez. It is sponsored by the Office of Faith Formation, RCL Benziger, and Our Sunday Visitor.

Want to attend the summit?
The Summer Catechetical Summit in Wichita will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 20; and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 21 in Chanute. The theme this year is “Eucharist: Source and Summit of Catechesis.”
Those who wish to attend either summit may register at CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org/faith, by Friday, Aug. 12. There is no cost and a light breakfast and lunch will be served. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 316-269-3940.
Audio interview available
A 13-minute interview with Dr. Willey is available at CatholicAdvance.org. In the audio interview, Dr. Willey talks about his journey from evangelicalism to Catholicism, his academic journey, and about what led to his crossing the Atlantic to teach in the United States.

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