Saline diocese meets their bishop-elect

By Karen Bonar, The Salina Register
SALINA — One day following the 19th anniversary of his ordination as a priest, Msgr. Gerald “Jerry” Vincke was introduced as the newly appointed bishop of the Salina Diocese.
“I want to thank the Holy Father for his confidence in me,” Bishop-elect Vincke, 53, said during the June 13 press conference.
Born outside of Saginaw, Mich., Bishop-elect Vincke was the ninth of the 10 children of Fidelis and the late Henry Vincke.
“My dad worked for General Motors, Buick and was also a small time farmer,” Bishop-elect Vincke said. “I used to get up and milk the cows early in the morning. We owned about 130 acres, but we farmed about 500, which is really small.”
He compared his family’s farm to that of Father Kevin Weber’s family’s operation.
“He was talking about his family farming 4,800 acres. It’s mind-boggling to me how big the scale is here for farmers,” he said, but added, “I’m looking forward to getting on one of these big combine one of these days.”
The most substantial difference between the dioceses is geography. The Diocese of Lansing, Mich, has about 6,200 square miles, compared to the Salina Diocese’s 26,685 square miles.
“There’s a big, big difference,” Bishop-elect Vincke said. “It’s going to be a lot of miles they say, but I’m looking forward to it.”

Ordained June 12, 1999, at at St. Mary Cathedral in Lansing, Mich. by Bishop Carl F. Mengeling, Bishop-elect Vincke was pastor at St. Thomas the Apostle Parish in Ann Arbor, Mich., from 1999-2001, before being asked by his bishop to start a retreat house for youth.
“It was very hard in many ways,” he said of beginning Bethany House. “When you go to a parish you love — to rely on the Lord and the Lord’s will for my life.”
Yet the core of his life and philosophy is simple.
“I love to pray and I love to work,” he said. “I’m ready to get going, to get started here as soon as possible.”
He paused.
“Work and pray. It sounds like I should be a Benedictine instead,” he quipped, “but the Lord called me to the diocesan priesthood.”
Following Bethany House retreat center from 2001-04, Bishop-elect Vincke became the Director of Seminarians and Vocation Director in 2003 for the diocese of Lansing, Mich. He then became the Spiritual Director at the Pontifical North American College in Rome from 2010 to 2015. It was during those years in Rome that he completed his License in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.).
The focus of his studies included St. John Vianney and Evangelii Guadium by Pope Francis.
“The No. 1 thing for him was his pastoral charity,” Bishop-elect Vincke said of St. John Vianney. “His whole desire to give his life for his people. I think that was really beautiful reading about him. He used to go visit farms and get to know the families. He made himself available to the people. I think that’s a beautiful lesson. He gave everything he had for the people.”

He reflected on three main lessons during his priesthood.
“Prayer has to be the number one priority for priests,” he said. “That’s the No. 1 pastoral priority. The second is to listen — listen to the people always. The third thing I think to focus on right now is evangelization, really why does the Church exist? The Church exists to be a missionary Church. To be disciples to make disciples of the people. That’s what I have a heart for — to make disciples of the people.”
He referenced a multi-million dollar expansion project at his current parish, Holy Family Parish in Grand Blanc, Mich., a suburb of Flint.
“That’s exciting,” Bishop-elect Vincke said of the project. “But to me, when people come to the faith, that excites me. That’s why we do what we do.”

Another aspect of the Salina Diocese that excited Bishop-elect Vincke is the youth, both the Catholic schools and the vibrant youth ministry.
“I’m anxious to go there and play basketball with the kids, go to Friday night games,” he said of the 11 Elementary Schools and five high schools.
The Salina Diocese sends one of the largest contingents to the National Catholic Youth Conference. Bishop-elect Vincke said he hopes to attend, as well as be involved with the youth on an ongoing basis.
“I hope can get together with them for questions and answers,” he said. “The youth always seem to enjoy a sit-down. They have lots of questions.”

Bishop Weisenburger, the 11th bishop of the Salina Diocese, said he is “overjoyed” to learn of the new appointment.
“Bishop-elect Vincke will soon discover that he has been led to a vibrant diocese with a strong and healthy presbyterate and a Catholic lay faithful strong in their commitment to Christ and his Church,” Weisenburger said. “My prayers are with him today, along with prayerful gratitude to God for sending the good people of Salina a loving and faithful new shepherd.”
Bishop Weisenburger was installed on Nov. 29 as the bishop of the Diocese of Tucson, Ariz.

Bishop-elect Vincke was born July 9, 1964. His family includes six brothers and three sisters­.
He attended New Lothrop High School and Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., where he obtained a degree in public relations and marketing. He considers himself a “later” vocation because he was ordained after he turned 30 years old. While someone suggested he explore the seminary during high school, it was not a priority at the time.
“The first time somebody mentioned the priesthood to me, I was a senior in high school and I was walking out of Church with my girlfriend,” Bishop-elect Vincke said. “A priest said ‘Have you ever thought of being a priest?’ and I said ‘No.’ ”
The second time he was nudged about a priestly vocation was when he was the editor-in-chief of his college newspaper.
“I ended up interviewing the parish priest at the college campus,” Bishop-elect Vincke said. “I asked him a question and he looked at me and said ‘Have you ever thought about being a priest?’ ”
Because of his sports enthusiasm, he interned for the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team in their front office. Even though he was following his passion, there was a slight interior nudge.
“It felt like there was something more God wanted me to do,” he said. “I liked sports, but I felt God was calling me to something different.”
He completed his Philosophy studies at St. Thomas More College in Crestview, Ky., and his Theology studies at Athenaeum Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio and Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit, Mich.

As he looks to the future, Bishop-elect Vincke said he is excited to get to know the presbyterate.
“I know the western part [of Kansas], I’m looking forward to going out there and meeting all the priests,” he said. “Many have more than one parish. To me, making the time to be present to them … that’s what I hope to do.”
Bishop Earl Boyea, Bishop of Diocese of Lansing, Mich., said his diocese is honored one of their priests was selected to be a bishop.
“The priests of our diocese as well as myself will deeply miss our brother priest as he moves into this new ministry,” he said. “The Holy Father, Pope Francis, has honored not only Msgr. Vincke but our diocese with this appointment.
“We offer to Pope Francis our love and gratitude. Certainly, the good people of Holy Family Parish in Grand Blanc, Michigan, will also miss their pastor since they recognize in him the very gifts which the Holy See finds will provide loving leadership to the Diocese of Salina. He is a fine priest, a man of deep faith in Jesus Christ, and a gentle soul. Our loss is most sincerely their gain.”

Weber named executive director of the Kansas Catholic Conference

Chuck Weber, a Kansas legislator, will be spending time in Topeka next year – not representing District 85, though, he’ll be representing Kansas’ Catholics.
Weber, a member of Church of the Resurrection in Wichita, has been named executive director of the Kansas Catholic Conference effective July 15. He will also resign from the Kansas House on July 15, a post he has held since January 2016.
Archbishop Naumann of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, said the bishops of Kansas are excited about the skills Weber brings to the position.
“His background in public policy and communications will be a great asset to the organization. Most important, however, is that fact that Chuck is a deeply committed Catholic. He has our full confidence.”
Weber said he looks forward to working with policy makers and others in the public square to make life better for all Kansans. “Many of the solutions to our cultural and political challenges can be found in the wisdom of the Catholic Church’s beliefs and teaching,” he wrote in an email.
The recent debate and passage of the Adoption Protection Act in Kansas is a prime example of the growing threat to religious liberty faced by Catholics in Kansas and around the country, he said.
“The average Catholic in the pew would be both astonished and deeply offended to hear what was said about them and the faith they hold dear. Apathy and indifference to what’s happening in our state and country is no longer an option if we wish to preserve our freedoms and way of life.”
Weber will succeed Michael Schuttloffel, who is leaving the KCC after 10 years as executive director. “We are profoundly grateful for Michael’s hard and successful work on behalf of the church over the last decade,” Abp. Naumann said.
Rep. Weber played an important role in the recent passage of the Kansas Adoption Protection Act. He has a wide variety of professional experiences as a short film producer and writer and has a number of Catholic communications projects to his credit. He and his wife, Cindy, have been married 33 years and have five children.
The Kansas Catholic Conference is the public policy office of the Catholic Church in Kansas and represents Kansas’ four Catholic bishops at the state capitol in Topeka.
Schuttloffel on July 1 will become the executive director of the Council for American Private Education, a coalition of 22 national organizations serving private elementary and secondary schools, based in Germantown, Maryland. The National Catholic Education Association is a member of CAPE.

Michigan priest named bishop of Salina diocese

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Francis has named Msgr. Gerald L. Vincke, who is pastor of Holy Family Parish in Grand Blanc, Michigan, to be bishop of the Diocese of Salina, Kansas.
Bishop-designate Vincke, 53, is a priest of the Diocese of Lansing, Michigan. In 2016, the pope named him a “missionary of mercy.” He was one of more than 1,000 religious-order and diocesan priests who received a special papal mandate to preach and teach about God’s mercy during the 2015-16 Holy Year of Mercy.
The appointment was announced June 13 in Washington by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, the Vatican nuncio to the United States.
Monsignor Vincke was born July 9, 1964 in Saginaw, Michigan, ninth of ten children. He holds an associate degree in Journalism (1985) from Ferris State College in Big Rapids, Michigan.
Monsignor Vincke also studied Philosophy at Thomas More College in Crestview, Kentucky, 1986, and Theology at Athenaeum Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Bishop: Jesus did not abandon us after his ascension

Bishop Carl A. Kemme leads a Eucharistic Procession in a street north of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita, Sunday afternoon, June 3, the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ. The Eucharist was carried around the block before returning to the cathedral. (Advance photos)

Jesus, after his ascension, didn’t leave us like a ship on the stormy seas, Bishop Carl A. Kemme said Sunday, June 3.
Jesus knew as he was preparing to make the ultimate sacrifice, one that would perfect the bloody sacrifices of the old covenant, he said, that the church would need his presence after he returned to the Father.
“And so he left us his body and blood to nourish us, to calm our fears, and to give us the strength to continue on the pathway that leads to heaven,” Bishop Kemme said before a Eucharistic Procession around the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.
In the tabernacle or the monstrance, he said, Jesus remains with us like a loving spouse or parent. “His presence is unspeakably simple and yet profound. He does not speak but gazes upon us in our daily comings and goings, but his message is abundantly clear for those who believe: ‘I Am Here,’ with you always until the end of time.”
The church has encouraged a procession of the Blessed Sacrament for centuries, the bishop said, so that Jesus could be adored beyond the confines of the church.
“Jesus walked the pathways of Palestine and today he comes among us here in our neighborhood to sanctify our every step,” Bishop Kemme said. “Let us accompany him, as did the disciples, as he makes his way among us, now hidden, but no less present in the Sacred Host which will be my honor and privilege, as sinful as I am, to carry.”
May his presence sustain us in our trials, Bishop Kemme said, comfort us in our sorrows, calm us in our fears, embolden us in our desires, form us in our discipleship, and strengthen us for our journey.
“For one day, we shall sit with him at the banquet of the heavenly liturgy, forever singing his praises and experience the fullness of his joy, peace, and love.”

The procession traveled around the Cathedral campus on city streets.

Several events planned for diocese during Religious Freedom Week June 22-29

By Bonnie Toombs
The faithful of the Diocese of Wichita are invited later this month to join Catholics from across the United States to pray and act in support of religious liberty at home and abroad.
Serving Others in God’s Love: Religious Freedom Week 2018 begins Friday, June 22 on the Feast of Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher, and ends Friday, June 29, on the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul.
This year’s theme is “Serving Others in God’s Love.” Religious freedom is necessary if we are to continue to serve in areas like education, adoption and foster care, healthcare, and migration and refugee services.
As part of the commemoration, a rosary will be led by Bishop Carl A. Kemme at 8:30 a.m. Friday, June 22, on the southeast corner of the U.S. Courthouse, 401 N. Market, in Wichita. At 5:30 p.m. that day, St Catherine of Siena Parish will host a Mass and Eucharistic Procession for Religious Liberty. Afterward, all are invited to join in watching the movie Paul: Apostle of Christ at the parish.
Prayer for religious freedom continues on Tuesday, June 26, when the Stations of the Cross will be prayed at 5:30 p.m. at the Spiritual Life Center. On Friday, June 29, the diocese is hosting a day of service with opportunities to join together for work projects from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please call the office at 316-269-3935 to sign up for the day of service.
All parishes are invited to host activities in support of Religious Freedom during the week. It is a special time for us to reflect on the importance of religious freedom so that the church will continue to have the ability to carry out her mission of service and mercy.
The chairman of the USCCB’s Committee for Religious Liberty, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, said: “Religious freedom allows the space for people of faith to serve others in God’s love in ministries like education, adoption and foster care, healthcare, and migration and refugee services. We encourage people of faith to reflect on the importance of religious freedom so that we might have the space to carry out our mission of service and mercy, and we invite everyone to pray for our brothers and sisters who face intense persecution in other parts of the world.”
The USCCB said Religious Freedom Week has replaced the Fortnight for Freedom to center the event around the feast days of saints who bore particular witness to religious liberty and for other reasons. Resources for Religious Freedom Week and other religious liberty resources can be found at www.usccb.org/ReligiousFreedomWeek and www.usccb.org/freedom.
Toombs is director of the diocesan office of Respect Life and Social Justice Office.

Want to participate in the day of service?
Those who wish to take part in the day of service on Friday, June 29, may call 316-269-3935 or email toombsb@CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org.

Bishop Kemme to lead rosary June 22
Bishop Carl A. Kemme will lead a rosary to kick off the week at 8:30 a.m. Friday, June 22, on the southeast corner of the U.S. Courthouse, 401 N. Market, in Wichita.

Diocesan news, June 15, 2018

Theology weekend — Fred Morrison, a member of St. Thomas Aquinas Parish in Wichita, peruses tables of books provided by Eighth Day Books in Wichita during the Catholic Culture Conference June 1-3 at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
One of the speakers was Joseph Pearce, an English-born writer who attributes his conversion in part to reading G. K. Chesterton. (Advance photos)

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar for the next several weeks.
June
June 23: Jubilee Mass at 10:30 a.m. with the Sisters of St. Joseph
June 24: Holy Savior Mass followed by groundbreaking at 10 a.m.; Humanae Vitae 50th Anniversary Mass at Cathedral at 3:30 p.m.
June 25-30: Senior Adult Ministry Bus Trip to EWTN
Bishop Kemme has limited meetings and public appearances during the month of July.

Adult spelling bee fundraiser June 21
Spectators are invited to the ICT Bee Adult Spelling Bee Thursday, June 21, in the Dugan-Gorges Conference Center at Newman University in Wichita.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. Team spelling bee competition begins at 6 p.m. Seven teams of four have signed up to compete in the fun, fundraising event for the Sisters of St. Joseph Dear Neighbor Ministries.
The cost is $25 and includes hors-d’oeuvres, beer, and wine. For ticket information, visit DearNeighbor.org/dn-news/events, or contact Brenda Wasinger at 316-684-5120.

Bike camp for disabled children set for July
A bike camp will be offered this summer to help persons with disabilities learn how to ride a bicycle.
The iCan Bike Camp, for persons eight years and older, will be hosted July 16-18 in Wichita by the Independent Living Resources Center.
To register for the camp or for more information, visit www.ilrcks.org, call Cindi at 316-942-6300, ext. 222, or email her at cunruh@ilrcks.org.

Volunteer choir for Aug. 3-5 Catholic conference begins practice June 28
A volunteer choir and orchestra is being formed for the 18th annual Midwest Catholic Family Conference at Century II Convention Hall, Aug. 3-5.
The choir will sing for the 11 a.m. Masses on Saturday, Aug. 4, and Sunday, Aug. 5. Those available for only one of the Masses are still welcome to sing.
Rehearsals will be on Thursday evenings, from 7:30 to 9:30 starting Thursday, June 28. The final rehearsal for both the choir and the orchestra will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2 at Century II. Other than Aug. 2, all rehearsal dates are tentative.
The orchestra will accompany the choir only for the Sunday Mass. Orchestra members who also sing are encouraged to sing in the choir for the Mass on Saturday. The orchestra will have two rehearsals prior to the August 2 final rehearsal, to be determined later.
To volunteer or to get more information, please contact Mike Lawless at 683-0123, 641-5730, or mclawless@cox.net. Those interested in volunteering for the conference in other ways, may call 618-9787 or email to midwconf@cox.net.
All conference volunteers (including musicians) will receive discounted registration for the conference.

The pope’s intention
Here is Pope Francis’ prayer intention for this month:
Universal – Social Networks: That social networks may work towards that inclusiveness which respects others for their differences.

No excuse to miss Mass Sunday; several ‘last chance’ Masses now available
There are now several late Sunday Masses in Wichita, including two in Spanish, for those who hit the snooze button one too many times:
5 p.m.: Holy Savior
5:15 p.m.: Blessed Sacrament
6 p.m.: St. Elizabeth Ann Seton; St. Anne, en español
6:30 p.m.: Our Lady of Perpetual Help, en español
7 p.m.: St. Paul, WSU; St. Patrick, en español
9 p.m.: St. Paul, WSU
Sunday and daily Mass times for all parishes in the diocese may be found by parish at CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org.

Please remember our priests in your prayers
The Diocese of Wichita has a necrology, a listing of our deceased priests of the diocese online.
The necrology is arranged by months and includes the names of priests who died that month.
The faithful are invited to visit the page at CatholicDioceseOfWichita.org and clicking on “Find A Parish.” The “Necrology” link is on the right side of the parish listing home page.

Code of Ethical Standards are online
The Diocese of Wichita is continuously working to maintain and improve safe environment education for children and adults involved in parish and diocesan activities.
As part of that effort, the diocese has a Code of Ethical Standards for Church Personnel available at its website at cdowk.org. To find it, hover over “Links & Resources” and click on “Protection of Youth.”
The code discusses the general principals of the ethical standards and highlights the standards that should be maintained in professional relationships. It discusses topics such as conflicts of interest, harassment, sexual conduct, conduct with minors, and confidentiality, among others.
Every employee and volunteer of the diocese receives a copy of the Code at the beginning of their working relationship with the diocese. Employees and volunteers all read it and sign off regarding their intention to comply with these high standards before beginning their duties with the diocese.

Protection of youth information online
The Diocese of Wichita is committed to protecting children and young people. For information about how the diocese is working to create a safe environment for children and young people, or to report sexual abuse of minors by a church employee, go to www.cdowk.org, pull down the Resources link and click on “Protection of Youth.”
La Diócesis de Wichita está comprometida a proteger a niños y jóvenes. Para obtener información sobre cómo la diócesis está trabajando para crear un ambiente seguro para los niños y jóvenes, o para reportar un abuso sexual de menores por un empleado de la iglesia, puede ir a www.cdowk.org, vaya al botón de Recursos (Resources) y presione “Protección de la Juventud” (Protection of Youth).
Địa phận Wichita cam kết bảo vệ an toàn cho trẻ em và tuổi trẻ. Muốn biết chi tiết thế nào để tạo bầu không khí an toàn cho tuổi trẻ, hoặc cách thức khiếu nại về trường hợp nhân viên hoạt động cho Địa phận đã lạm dụng tình dục với trẻ em và tuổi trẻ, xin xem hoặc gửi qua internet theo địa chỉ www.cdowk.org, tìm xuống bảng liên kết và nhấn vào mục “Protection of the Youth”.

Pro-life ministry offering ‘pill kills’ DVD free
Physicians prescribe the pill to many young women to regulate monthly cycles, lessen cramping, or to control acne.
But the life and health threatening side effects from taking the pill are not worth it, according to the West Sedgwick County Chapter of Right to Life of Kansas. The pill not only causes abortions but has dangerous side-effects.
The chapter is offering a free DVD, “The Pill Kills Symposium,” that explains the problems associated with the pill.
For free copy of the DVD, send an email jcsfam6@yahoo.com with your name and address, or call Carolyn at 316-531-2227. For more information or to watch the DVD online, visit ThePillKills.org and click on “2012 National Symposium” box on the left of the home page.

Spiritual Life Center news, June 15, 2018

Enjoy two days of silence at the Spiritual Life Center on July 6-8
The faithful of the Diocese of Wichita are invited July 6-8 to experience God as they might never have before – in two days of silence, solitude in community, and prayer.
The Spiritual Life Center is again offering a silent retreat “The Carthusian Experience,” designed to be a time of deep renewal for participants. It begins at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, July 6, and ends Sunday, July 8, with Mass.
Participants will follow the manner of life of the Carthusians, an order founded by Saint Bruno in 1084 and is currently composed of about 450 monks and nuns who live a solitary life at the heart of the church.
Participants will consecrate their days entirely to prayer and to seeking God in the secret of their hearts. They will also intercede for the church and for the salvation of the whole world. The time in retreat will balance between silence and solitude found in one’s room or in chapel, prayer in common and in adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, and common celebration of the Mass in a more contemplative manner.
The weekend is a silent retreat allowing space for God to speak to us individually. Individual spiritual direction, as well as opportunity for the Sacrament of Confession, the Mass, and Eucharistic Adoration, will be provided.
Registration is limited and early registration is encouraged. More information and pre-registration is available by visiting www.slcwichita.org and clicking on Calendar of Events, or by calling the center at (316) 744-0167.

Marriage getaway June 16 at the SLC
Married couples are invited to a Marriage Enrichment Day Saturday, June 16, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
This day is designed to draw couples closer to God and closer to each other so that their marriages thrive. Couples will spend the day looking at ways in which they can be more united in love by uniting their marriage to Christ.
Check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. The event begins at 9 and ends with Mass at 5 p.m.
The cost is $60 per couple and includes materials, lunch, breakfast items, snacks, coffee, and water. Register by visiting slc.retreatportal.com/events.

Retreat for healing and reconciliation at the SLC
The Return of the Prodigal Son retreat July 13-15 at the Spiritual Life Center will reassure and challenge participants in the fatherhood of our God and in being his son or daughter. The retreat is set for the weekend, but there is an option to attend Saturday’s portion only.
“[The retreat] is a combination of art, scripture, Catholic theology, and self-reflection,” Father Ken Van Haverbeke said. “Henri Nouwen’s book ‘The Return of the Prodigal Son’ is a personal favorite of mine and what this retreat is based on.”
The retreat will include reflections on how we are all called to be in the role of spiritual fatherhood for others. Ultimately the weekend is about healing: healing of memories, healing of emotions, healing of lives.
Fr. Van Haverbeke said, “The retreat is designed to help a person to respond to a merciful Father: a Father who waits for us, and runs to meet us where we are at, not where we are ‘supposed’ to be.”
Participants who cannot make the entire weekend retreat are invited to attend a day-long workshop Saturday, July 14, called “Jesus, Saint Luke, Rembrandt, Henri Nouwen, and a Painting.” The workshop participants will join in with the weekend retreatants for Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Want to participate?
Regular retreat pricing applies for the weekend. Register and pay by July 2 to receive an early bird discount. All registrations include a $50 non-refundable deposit. The Saturday only program cost is $20 and includes lunch.
Reservations can be made on line at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167. Please register in advance to ensure space and food quantities.

Christendom Academy begins June 9 at Spiritual Life Center
Dusty Gates, Howard Clark, and Matthew Umbarger will team teach “The Christendom Academy” on Tuesdays from June 19 through Aug. 7 at the Spiritual Life Center. The academy will meet for eight weeks, focusing on one cultural epoch each week.
The program highlights the unique contributions Western Civilization has made to our understanding of philosophy, theology, spirituality, morality, and citizenship. Students will be invited to learn new ways to answer perennial questions such as: Who am I? Where have I come from and where am I going? What contribution am I called to make for my own salvation, for the good of my family, and the good of the world?
Course content will be drawn from a handful of writings essential to the development of Christian culture. The modules, in succession, will be: The Greeks, The Romans, The Hebrews, The Evangelists, The Fathers, The Early Medievals, The Late Medievals, and The Moderns.
The class will meet from 9 a.m. to noon each Tuesday, and will include lunch. Tuition is $165, which does not include the optional textbooks. To register, or more information, visit www.SLCWichita.org.

Evening series about reading the Bible begins on July 5
Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke will lead a course “How to Read the Bible” on three Thursdays in July at the Spiritual Life Center.
The course meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. July 5, 12, and 19. During the three-evening series participants will learn how God speaks to us through scripture and why the text is so important to our spiritual lives today.
The cost is $25 per person. Advance registration is requested. Visit the Spiritual Life Center’s webpage at www.slcwichita.org to register or call (316) 744-0167.

Monthly Mass with children at the SLC Thursday, June 28
Caregivers and their children are invited to the monthly “KidsPrayToo!: Mass with Children” at the Spiritual Life Center on Thursday, June 28.
The Mass begins at 11:15 a.m. Fr. Van Haverbeke will speak especially to the littlest among us at the Mass. This program gives parents and caregivers an opportunity to teach their children without worrying about disturbing other Mass goers around them.
All families are invited to pack a lunch to enjoy in the dining room or courtyard afterwards. No registration is necessary.

Father Sherman Orr class on defending the faith June 21 at SLC
An apologetics course, “Theology vs. Apologetics,” will be offered at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita. The “apologia” sessions take tough topics within the church and teach the faithful how to defend our faith.
This month Rev. Sherman Orr, pastor of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish in Wichita, will talk about the difference between theology and apologetics, and where the Catechism of the Catholic Church fits in. His talk will have a special emphasis on the “Four Last Things,” and will discuss some ideas that theology offers about the subjects that might not be found in the catechism.
Each session of Apologia addresses a different topic pertinent to 21st century Catholics to aid in their obligation to defend and explain the faith.
The program features a one-hour presentation, followed by 15 to 30 minutes of Q and A, and discussion of the month’s topic or any topic pertaining to apologetics.
The cost is $10 per person. Advance registration appreciated but walk-ins are welcome. Visit the Spiritual Life Center’s web page at www.slcwichita.org to register or call (316) 744-0167.

Youth and school news, June 15, 2018

Scouts honored at Mass — Scouts and their leaders were honored at the annual Scouting Religious Emblems Mass Sunday, June 10, at St. Francis of Assisi Church in Wichita. Celebrating the Mass were Scout Chaplain Stuart Smeltzer, left, and Fr. Andrew Walsh, who is an Eagle Scout. Adults honored were, from left, Dennis Rottinghaus of Wichita, Michelle Smith-Puckett of Girard, and Tammy Bauer of Wichita. Youth honored were, from left, Kaitlyn Bauer, Brayden Suellentrop, Luke Richmeier, and Mark Smith, all of Wichita. (Courtesy photo)
Camp Team — From left, front row, Mary Linnebur, Brynn Suellentrop, Brittany Meyer, Sky Creed, Kaylee Konda; middle row, Noelle Dooley, Emma Coulter, Amy Suenram, Robin Bradfield, Becky Costello, Alyssa Cooke, Carmen Macias, Peter Spexarth; back row, Patrick Carney, Gerard Eck, Sebastian Orth, Matthew Cooke, JacobGrabendike, Cole Schneiders, Will Mohr, Taylor Nemechek, Paul Johnson, Max Genilo, Director Matthew Dolechek. Not pictured, Seth Arnold

Totus Tuus teams ready to catechize
Totus Tuus teams will be visiting parishes throughout the Diocese of Wichita this summer for a week dedicated to sharing the Gospel and promoting the Catholic faith through evangelization, catechesis, Christian witness, and Eucharistic worship. The camp team will be leading the program at Camp WaJaTo in Lyons for youth from fifth through 12th grades.
(Individual team names are listed clockwise from top left.)

Team 1: Colin Keiser, Blaise Burns, Isabel Resa, and Grace Leonard
Team 2: Caleb Kuestersteffen, Nathan Sizelove, Brigette Sponsel, and Suzette Sponsel
Team 3: Brock Jameson, Nick Poland, Maddy Hammer, and Monica Jirak
Team 4: Trevor Meyer, Andrew Hamel, Marie Baert, and Lauren Kruse
Team 5: Matthew Doerneman Michael Schlesinger, Abby Normand, and Kinsey Levendofsky
Team 6: Luke Meyerhoff, David Oberley, Clara Towey, and Kara Meyer
Team 7: Austin Mernagh, Matthew Nguyen, Emma Klausmeyer, and Julia Sanders
Team 8: Steven Nguyen, Christopher Rziha, Monica Davied, and Mariah Stuever
Team 9: John Genilo, Chase Johnson, Megan Neises, and Jamie Toon

‘Be not afraid!’ bishop tells 10 newly ordained

Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s joy is evident as he embraces Father Michael Brungardt Saturday, May 26, at Church of the Magdalen.

Bishop Carl A. Kemme repeated a phrase in his homily to the 10 men awaiting ordination Saturday, May 26, at Church of the Magdalen in Wichita.
“Be not afraid,” he exhorted, “to profess your love for Christ, day after day, season after season, year by year, until the Lord calls you to participate in the heavenly liturgy. To declare this for all to know, like Peter in the Gospel, by feeding his lambs, tending his sheep, and caring for his flock.”
That will be their lifelong mission, Bishop Kemme said sitting on a cathedra below a towering crucifix in front of a church overflowing with family, friends, and the faithful.
“Do not be afraid to labor long and hard for this mission, to resist the ever-present temptations to laziness and sloth or to consider your wants and needs ahead of and more important than those of the people you are called to serve,” he said.
Bishop Kemme encouraged them not to be self-indulgent and lazy priests. “Rather, be priests with zeal, enthusiasm and the fire of divine love.”
As Pope Francis recently stated, Bishop Kemme said, “There is so much to do. So, do not be afraid, let’s do it together.”
He opened his homily by recalling the period in 1978 when Pope Paul VI died and when Pope John Paul I was elected and died shortly after.
“How well I remember Pope John Paul I, who captivated the world with his smile, his joyful spirit,” Bishop Kemme said. “One can only imagine how he would have changed the church but the Lord gave him only 30 days to serve.
“How well I remember just weeks later his elected successor, the relatively young and most interesting Karol Woytla appearing on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Little did most of us know that a great man had walked onto the world stage and history would begin to be made.”
It was Pope John Paul II, at his Mass of Installation, Bishop Kemme said, who repeated Jesus’ words that resonated in St. Peter’s Square and around the world: “Do not be afraid!”
He directed the phrase to the 10 deacons. “I cannot think of better or more important words to address to you today as you begin in our diocese the ministry of priest, that if lived and exercised with diligence, care, and loving concern, in imitation of the Savior, will make history, for you, for our diocese and for the people you will serve.”
There is much fear in the world, Bishop Kemme said, fear of failure, suffering, of want, of death, and other fears, but fear has no power over Christians and certainly priests.
“As St. Paul wrote to the Romans, in Christ, we have conquered overwhelmingly through him who loves us. Fear paralyzes even the best of us, but courage is what is needed, a Christian courage, a courage that comes from the Holy Spirit,” he said. “Christian courage mobilizes the Lord’s disciples for evangelization, for stewardship, for service, so as to become fully alive in Christ Jesus.”
Do not be afraid to be an “alter Christus,” another Christ, he said, adding that it is a work of the Holy Spirit, and that they should be God’s instruments to building up the kingdom on earth, to sanctify, and to guide the flock of Jesus.
“Do not be afraid to surrender everything you have for the ministry,” Bishop Kemme said. “All your time, all your talents, all your treasure, for as stewards, these gifts have been given to you for others and if given generously, God will return them and bless them a 100 times over.”
Defend the flock entrusted to you, he said, warning the newly ordained about the forces of evil that they face. “Do not be afraid of these wolves, but with the armor of truth hold tightly to the lambs entrusted to your pastoral care.”
Bishop Kemme told the ordinandi to live, as St. Paul said, in a manner worthy of their call, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another through love, striving to preserve the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.
“Once ordained, your life is a living Gospel for all to hear, a message of hope and mercy, of God’s faithfulness and love; you will be a bridge that will connect those whom you will serve to the fountain of God’s amazing grace.”

Ordination to the diaconate Saturday, May 19
In his homily at the ordination to the diaconate Saturday, May 19, Bishop Kemme said he was asked what he enjoyed most about being a bishop.
“It was not challenging for me to answer that delightful question, for I truly enjoy so many things about this new life and ministry of mine,” he said.
Ordination is at the top of his list. “There really are no words to describe the incredible joy that a bishop receives when he consecrates men for sacred service, first as deacons and then later, God willing, as priests.”
Bishop Kemme said the honor of doing so is magnified by the fact that every man ordained could have done anything else with their lives, as gifted, talented and skilled as they are, but they instead answered the call of Christ “to live a life of service, a life of humble charity, a life of unfeigned love and unassuming authority, to have heartfelt concern for the sick and the poor, to possess the purity of innocence and the observance of spiritual discipline, all of this in radical imitation of and conformity to Christ, the Lord.”
Their commitment instills him, Bishop Kemme said, with a profound sense of wonder and awe at how God works.
“We are also filled, I hope, with gratitude and respect for these men, who in spite of the culture and generation from which they come and the aspirations that so many in that culture and generation would have had for them, have heard and said ‘yes’ to a different call, to be men of the church, men with a mission and a purpose to bring the Joy of the Gospel to every creature.”
Some might say what the seminarians are doing is absurd, he said: to bind themselves in obedience to the bishop, to embrace a life of celibate chastity, and to give themselves of a life of service.
“But we believe otherwise, for the demands of the Gospel have always presented themselves to previous generations as difficult, if not impossible; we hold onto the promise of the Master that those who give up all of this will receive a 100 times more in this life and eternal life in the age to come.”
He said the three men ordained to the diaconate when their names were called, responded by saying “present.”
“This is the first indication that they are willing to publicly embrace the office soon to be entrusted to them,” Bishop Kemme said. “They then physically moved from their place among the baptized to a place here among us, not to indicate a place of privilege, but rather a place of service, set apart for a different ministry in the church.”
They are and will be, he said, present: to the promptings of the Holy Spirit; to become a lifelong force of selfless service in a world that because of original sin is prone to selfish pursuits and mindless pleasures; for the challenges of radical discipleship lived out in obedience; for a life of celibacy; and for a life of prayer.
“All of this is contained in that one response, ‘present,’ present here today among us as those Jesus calls in the Gospel to be no longer his slaves, but his friends, whom he appoints to go and bear fruit that will remain,” he said.
“My dear sons and brothers, may fruit come about through your preaching, your teaching, and your service to the bishop, the presbyteral college, and the community of faith that is our diocese.”
Referring the second reading of the day, Bishop Kemme urged the deacons-to-be to remember the words of St. Peter: “As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards. Whoever preaches, let it be with the words of God; whoever serves, let it be with the strength that God supplies, so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom belong glory and dominion, forever and ever. Amen.”

Five of the ordinandi listen to Bishop Kemme.
Bishop Kemme with most of his priests of the diocese. (Advance photos)
The Most Rev. John B. Brungardt, left, bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City, and Bishop Carl A. Kemme with the newly ordained priests of the Diocese of Wichita. Father Michael Brungardt is Bishop Brungardt’s nephew. (Advance photos)
Bishop Kemme ordains Father Matt Davied May 26 at Church of the Magdalen.
The Rev. Mr. Drew Dellasega, ordained to the diaconate on May 19, reads the Gospel.

Bishop Kemme announces the assignments for the new priests

Bishop Carl A. Kemme has assigned the newly ordained priests. Here are their assignments:
The Rev. Michael G. Brungardt - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, St. Margaret Mary Parish, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Garett P. Burns - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Isaac J. Coulter - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, St. Francis of Assisi Parish, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Matthew C. Davied - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, Parish of the Magdalen, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Nicholaus L. Jurgensmeyer - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Michael L. Kerschen - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, Holy Cross Parish, Hutchinson, Holy Trinity Parish, Little River, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Christopher J. Martin - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, Parish of the Magdalen, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. James M. Schibi - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Todd J. Shepherd - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Chaplain, Trinity Catholic High School, Hutchinson, Effective, June 19, 2018
The Rev. Derek J. Thome - Newly Ordained Priest, Parochial Vicar, St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, Wichita, Effective, June 19, 2018

Bishop announces deacon assignments

Three ordained to the diaconate — Matthew T. Siegman, left, Kurt A. Pauly, and Andrew D.C. Dellasega, were ordained to the transitional diaconate by Bishop Carl A. Kemme Saturday, May 12, in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.

Bishop Carl A. Kemme has assigned the three newly-ordained transitional deacons for the summer:
Deacon Andrew Dellasega: St. Mark Parish, Colwich
Deacon Kurt Pauly: St. Paul’s Parish, Lyons and Holy Name, Bushton
Deacon Matthew Siegman: Christ the King Parish, Wichita
They will return to their seminaries in the fall for their last year of study.

After being vested with a deacon’s stole and dalmatic, Bishop Kemme hands a Book of the Gospels to the Rev. Mr. Dellasega. (Advance photos)
Bishop Kemme ordains Kurt Pauly.
The bishop continues celebrating the ordination Mass with the new deacons and most of the priests of the Diocese of Wichita assisting. (Advance photos)

Grant will allow Wichita’s Catholic Charities to connect to Pittsburg office

Catholic Charities counselors in Wichita will soon be assisting clients in Pittsburg face to face – electronically.
Southeast Kansas Services at Catholic Charities received a $47,058 grant Tuesday, May 15, to establish a telecommunications center to provide Catholic Charities services to Pittsburg clients from Wichita.
The telecommunication equipment at both sites will be installed and will be operational by the beginning of July as a result of the grant from the Leon V. and Dorothy M. Skubitz Foundation.
“We are honored to be the recipients of this year’s Skubitz Family Grant in support of our work to improve the lives of those living in Crawford County,” said Wendy Glick, executive director of Catholic Charities.
“With this support we are able to bring a menu of services to those in need in the area that otherwise were not easily accessible.”
Southeast Kansas Service Program Director Casey Brown said the telecommunication equipment is HIPPA compliant.
Services provided at SEK Catholic Charities’ offices, located in the Wesley House in Pittsburg, include Cana Counseling for family and marriages; Supportive Services for Veteran Families which help keep veterans and their families housed; and a program for people who are victims of abuse called the SAFE Project which include safety planning and responsible parenting and healthy relationships. Other services include mental health counseling and financial literacy.
Mr. and Mrs. Skubitz, longtime Pittsburg residents, left their estate in trust with BMO Harris Bank to create a foundation that would award annual grants to be used exclusively for charitable purposes, with strong preference given to Crawford County, Kansas.

Diocesan news, June 1, 2018

Bishop Kemme’s calendar
Here is Bishop Carl A. Kemme’s calendar for the next several weeks.
June
June 1: Totus Tuus Team blessing and lunch after noon Mass at Cathedral; Evening with Seminarians at 6 p.m. at Pittsburg State University
June 2: Diocese of Salina ordination to the priesthood, 10 a.m. at Salina cathedral; Confirmation Mass at 5:30 p.m. followed by blessing of new parish hall for St. Anthony, Strong City, and St. Rose of Lima in Council Grove
June 3: Fr. Kapaun Day Mass at 11 a.m. at St. John Nepomucene in Pilsen; Corpus Christi at 3 p.m. at the Cathedral
June 7: Presbyteral Council; Confirmation Mass for St. Mary, Moline; and St. Robert, Sedan, at 6:30 p.m. at St. Mary in Moline
June 8: Confirmation Mass at 6:30 p.m. at Sacred Heart in Colwich
June 9: Feast Day Mass at 9 a.m. at Immaculate Heart of Mary Convent; 100th Anniversary Mass of the Dedication of Sacred Heart Church in Colwich at 5:30 p.m.
June 10: 25th Anniversary Mass of the Dedication of the new Sacred Heart Church in Fredonia at 10:30 a.m.
June 12-14: USCCB General Assembly in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
June 23: Jubilee Mass at 10:30 a.m. with the Sisters of St. Joseph
June 24: Holy Savior Mass followed by ground breaking at 10 a.m.; Humanae Vitae 50th Anniversary Mass at Cathedral at 3:30 p.m.
June 25-30: Senior Adult Ministry Bus Trip to EWTN
Bishop Kemme has limited meetings and public appearances during the month of July.

Dear Neighbor awarded mini-grant
Dear Neighbor Ministries of Wichita received a $500 Seed Grant from Volunteer Kansas.
The ministry received the grant May 21 to restore a handicap-accessible raised garden bed at the ministry’s office.
The mini-grants help support service projects that will help foster volunteerism.
Dear Neighbor Ministries provides emergency and outreach support for the Hilltop Neighborhood in Wichita.

Bike camp for disabled children set for July
A bike camp will be offered this summer to help persons with disabilities learn how to ride a bicycle.
The iCan Bike Camp, for persons eight years and older, will be hosted July 16-18 in Wichita by the Independent Living Resources Center.
To register for the camp or for more information, visit www.ilrcks.org, call Cindi at 316-942-6300, ext. 222, or email her at cunruh@ilrcks.org.

Clinic Wingnuts baseball fundraiser June 10
The Guadalupe Clinic, a diocesan health care ministry, will host its 30th Annual Wingnuts Baseball Game fundraiser Sunday, June 10.
The Wichita Wingnuts will play the Kansas City T-Bones at Lawrence-Dumont Stadium in Wichita. The first pitch will be at 1:05 p.m.
Tickets are $5. They will be sold after Masses at some parishes and may be purchased by contacting Alley Miller at the Guadalupe Clinic at 316-264-8974 ext. 213 or email guadalupe@GuadalupeClinic.com.

Youth and school news, June 1, 2018

Children pilgrims — Students of St. Joseph School in Ost learn about St. Mary Church in Aleppo from Amanda Casper, a parishioner. It was one of three churches they visited the week of May 14 as part of an all-school pilgrimage. The students, who come from seven Ost-area parishes, also visited St. Joseph Church in Andale and St. Anthony of Padua Church in Garden Plain. (Courtesy photo)

Diocesan Catholic high schools graduate 552

The four Catholic high schools of the Diocese of Wichita graduated 552 students in ceremonies last month in Pittsburg, Hutchinson, and Wichita.

St. Mary’s Colgan Catholic High School, Pittsburg
St. Mary’s Colgan High School in Pittsburg graduated 32 students May 16.
Trevor Graham, the son of Troy and Laurie Graham, was named valedictorian.
Kamree Pace, the daughter of Mike and Renee Pace, was named salutatorian.
Both families are members of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Pittsburg.

Trinity Catholic High School, Hutchinson
Trinity Catholic Jr/Sr High School in Hutchinson graduated 43 students Sunday, May 13.
Valedictorians were Emily Hammeke, the daughter of Joe and Stacy Hammeke; Kyndal Brening, the daughter of Kevin and Pat Brening; and Erika Frisbie, the daughter of Antonia Frisbie and Charles Frisbie.
Tessa Yackley, the daughter of Dr. Mark and Laura Yackley, was named salutatorian. They are all residents of Hutchinson.
The Hammekes and Frisbees are members of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish. The Brenings and the Yackleys are members of Church of the Holy Cross.

Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School, Wichita
Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic School graduated 206 seniors May 20.
Joseph Hathaway, the son of Therese and Jay Hathaway, members of St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, was named valedictorian. He also was named a Msgr. Barth Award winner.
Thanh Pham, the daughter of Sang Pham and Nga Le, was named salutatorian and a recipient of a Msgr. Barth Award. They are members of St. Margaret Mary Parish.
Four other students were named Msgr. Barth Award winners: Kaitlyn Bauer, the daughter of Vincent and Tamara Bauer, members of Blessed Sacrament Parish; Emma Conover, daughter of Chad and Kelli Conover, members of Church of the Magdalen; Maria Collins, daughter of Wade and Tina Collins, members of Church of the Magdalen; and Kelly House, daughter of Chris and Theresa House, members of St. Thomas Aquinas Parish.

Bishop Carroll Catholic High School, Wichita
Bishop Carroll Catholic High School graduated 271 seniors May 20.
Lindsay M. Smith, the daughter of David and Amy Smith, was named valedictorian. They are members of St. Catherine of Siena Parish. She also was named a Msgr. Barth Award winner.
Kyle S. Weed, the son of Josh and Libby Weed, was named salutatorian. They are members of St. Jude Parish.
The school had four other Msgr. Barth winners:
Lauren A. Beugelsdyk, the daughter of Dan and Tina Beugelsdyk, members of St. Francis of Assisi Parish; Allison E. Gregg, a daughter of Randall and Heather Gregg, members of St. Francis of Assisi Parish; Jaci L. Reichenberger, the daughter of Dr. Ron and Joni Reichenberger, members of St. Catherine of Siena Parish; and Maguire A. Sullivan, the daughter of Justin and Tamara Sullivan, members of St. Mark Parish.

The 2018 Barth, McNeill winners

The Catholic School Office has announced the recipients of the 2018 Msgr. Barth Scholar Award and the Msgr. Leon McNeill Scholar award.

Msgr. Arthur Barth Scholar Award
The following students are 2018 Msgr. Arthur Barth Scholar Award recipients:
Lauren Beugelsdyk, Allison Gregg, Jaci Reichenberger, Lindsay Smith and Maguire Sullivan of Bishop Carroll Catholic High School, Wichita; Kaitlyn Bauer, Maria Collins, Emma Conover, Joseph Hathaway, Kelly House and Thanh Pham of Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School, Wichita.

Msgr. Leon McNeill Scholar Award
The following students are 2018 Msgr. Leon McNeill Scholar Award recipients:
Hayley Stewart, St. Mary Parish School, Derby; Cohen Ayres, Holy Spirit Catholic School, Goddard; Alexandra Schreiner, Colby Schreiner, Lauren Theis, and Kara Thimesch, St. Patrick Catholic School, Kingman; Maria Mick, St. Mary Catholic School, Newton; Aiden Flemming, Will Glover, Emily Imhof, Allison Marietta, and Ashley Marietta, St. Mary’s Junior High, Pittsburg; Patrick Olson, Blessed Sacrament Catholic School; Justin Moritz, Hoang Nguyen, Jack Scherer, and Gianna Watts, Christ the King Catholic School; Tirah Daniels, Holy Savior Catholic Academy; MaKenzie Orr, Magdalen Catholic School; Max Ercolani and Trevor Sweat, Resurrection Catholic School; Melissa Nhi Hoang and Oscar Sanchez, St. Anne Catholic School; Johathan Kha and Sebastian Ruiz, St. Margaret Mary Catholic School; Hannah Allmond, St. Peter Catholic School; and Samuel Calderon, Jackson Reusser, and Andrew Schreck of St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic School, Wichita.

About the Msgr. Barth Awards
The Msgr. Arthur Barth High School Scholar Award recognizes high school seniors who have all As, with the possible exception of one B+ in an honors class. These students have taken at least eight hours of honors courses, scored Exemplary on their two most recent Diocesan Religion assessments, have a minimum ACT score of 30 (or an SAT score of 1340), and an exemplary discipline record. In addition, they are active in parish stewardship, have the recommendation of their Pastor and the chaplain of their high school, been involved in at least two school activities, and demonstrated effective leadership in at least one organization.

About the Msgr. McNeill Awards
The Msgr. Leon McNeill Eighth Grade Scholar Award recognizes eighth grade students who are A students, ranked 4 (Exemplary) on the most recent Diocesan Religion assessment and the most recent State Mathematics and Reading assessments, have an exemplary conduct record, and received a rating of at least 15 on the Grade School Recommendation. These students have been approved by their Pastor as being active parish members.

St. James Catholic School Principal Richard Guy, Keteri Mosier, and Father Michael Schemm. (Courtesy photo)

St. James Catholic School promotes first eighth grade student since 1972
AUGUSTA – Kateri Mosier is the first St. James Catholic School student to graduate from the eighth grade since 1972 – 46 years.
Kateri, the daughter of Dennis and Penny Mosier of Augusta, was honored at a Promotion Mass Tuesday, May 22, at St. James Church in Augusta. She has been a student at St. James since preschool.
Principal Richard Guy said Kateri has been a model student and a role model for schoolmates following her.
“She has a strong faith in Jesus Christ,” he said. “St. James Catholic School is very proud of her.”
The school has been adding grades in recent years culminating with the eighth grade.

Host families sought
Host families are being sought for high school exchange students for the 2018-2019 academic year.
The students will arrive in mid-August and will attend local high schools. The students speak English, are covered by medical insurance, and have spending money for their personal expenses.
Approved families can view online student applications and select the student that best matches their own family. For more information, call Wilma Fast at 316-681-1236.

Spiritual Life Center news, June 1, 2018

Marriage getaway June 16 at the SLC
Married couples are invited to a Marriage Enrichment Day Saturday, June 16, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
This day is designed to draw couples closer to God and closer to each other so that their marriages thrive. Couples will spend the day looking at ways in which they can be more united in love by uniting their marriage to Christ.
Check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. The event begins at 9 and ends with Mass at 5 p.m.
The cost is $60 per couple and includes materials, lunch, breakfast items, snacks, coffee, and water. For more information contact Jake Samour at 316-685-5240. Register by visiting slc.retreatportal.com/events.

Mini-retreat for dads June 15 at the SLC
The Spiritual Life Center will host its annual mini-retreat for dads from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 15. The evening will consist of social time and drinks, dinner with the guys, and a talk. Dinner will be a German feast of brats, potato salad, and sauerkraut, along with beer and dessert.
This year the center welcomes Jim Rundell to share his testimony of how ministering with those who are incarcerated has changed his relationship with the Lord. Rundell is a former administrator at the Spiritual Life Center and has spent years serving with the St. Dismas Ministry to the Incarcerated.
Participants are encouraged to reserve a bedroom on Friday evening if they wish to extend their retreat time. The cost for the program is $15 per person. Register by visiting the Spiritual Life Center’s web page at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167.

Reading group meeting at the SLC
The Spiritual Life Center will hold its first Good Books meeting of the summer Thursday, June 7, about Nathaniel Hawthorne’s, The Scarlet Letter. The course meets monthly throughout the summer to learn more about the novel and how it relates to Christians.
Kapaun Mt. Carmel teacher Angie Etheredge leads the summer sessions which will take place on June 7, July 12, and Aug. 2. The study meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. each of these evenings. The cost for the summer course is $30 and the book will be available in the Center’s bookstore.
Please go to www.SLCWichita.org or call (316) 744-0167 to register. Pre-registration is requested but walk-ins are welcome.

Christendom Academy June 9 at the SLC
Dusty Gates, Howard Clark, and Matthew Umbarger will team teach a new program at the Spiritual Life Center this summer called “The Christendom Academy.” The academy will meet once a week for eight weeks from June 19 through Aug. 7, focusing on one cultural epoch each week.
The program highlights the unique contributions Western Civilization has made to our understanding of philosophy, theology, spirituality, morality, and citizenship.
Students will be invited to learn new ways to answer perennial questions like who am I? Where have I come from and where am I going? What contribution am I called to make for my own salvation, for the good of my family, and the good of the world?
Course content will be drawn from a handful of writings essential to the development of Christian culture. The modules are The Greeks, The Romans, The Hebrews, The Evangelists, The Fathers, The Early Medievals, The Late Medievals, and The Moderns.
The class will meet from 9 a.m. to noon each Tuesday, and will include lunch. Tuition is $165, which does not include the optional textbooks. For more information or to register visit www.SLCWichita.org.

Annulment Workshop June 12 at Spiritual Life Center, Wichita
Fr. Brian Nelson will present a program about annulments from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 12, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The workshop will explain the annulment process, talk about who needs an annulment and why, look at some of the common myths and fears, and address costs and length of time associated with annulments.
Father Brian Nelson is the diocesan judicial vicar and director of the marriage tribunal.
There is no charge but advance registration is recommended. Registration is available online at www.SLCWichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167.

Miles Christi group to host retreats in June, August at the SLC
The Miles Christi religious order will host two retreats on the Spiritual Exercises in Wichita this summer at the Spiritual Life Center. The retreat for women takes place June 22-24 and the men’s retreat is scheduled for Aug. 24-26.
The Spiritual Exercises are a silent retreat that includes talks and times for silent meditation. The priests of the Miles Christi order will be in Wichita to preach during the retreat using the method and principles of St. Ignatius of Loyola. In general the retreats begin at 4 p.m. on Friday and conclude Sunday at 5 p.m.
According to the Miles Christi website, the Spiritual Exercises have proven to be an excellent means of conversion and sanctification throughout the centuries. In addition, the Magisterium of the Church has commended them numerous times.
The Miles Christi religious order are priests and brothers devoted to the pursuit of sanctity for the greater glory of God. The mission of the order is the sanctification of the laity.
To register, visit www.mileschristi.org or email kansas@spiritualexercises.net.

Father Sherman Orr to lead evening class on defending the faith on June 21 at SLC
“Theology vs. Apologetics,” part of a monthly apologetics course, will be presented at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.
The “apologia” sessions take tough topics within the church and teach the faithful how to defend our faith.
This month, Rev. Sherman Orr, pastor of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Church in Wichita, will talk about the difference between theology and apologetics, and where the Catechism fits in. His talk will have a special emphasis on the “four last things,” and will discuss some ideas that theology offers us on the subjects that might not be found in the Catechism.
The program features a one-hour presentation, followed by 15 to 30 minutes of Q and A time and discussion of the month’s topic or any topic pertaining to apologetics.
The cost is $10 per person. Advance registration appreciated but walk-ins are welcome. Visit the Spiritual Life Center’s web page at www.slcwichita.org to register or call (316) 744-0167.

Enjoy two days of silence at the SLC July 6-8
The faithful of the Diocese of Wichita are invited July 6-8 to experience God as they might never have before – in two days of silence, solitude in community, and prayer.
The Spiritual Life Center is again offering a silent retreat “The Carthusian Experience,” designed to be a time of deep renewal for participants. It begins at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, July 6, and ends Sunday, July 8, with Mass.
Participants will follow the manner of life of the Carthusians, an order founded by Saint Bruno in 1084 and is currently composed of about 450 monks and nuns who live a solitary life at the heart of the church.
Participants will consecrate their days entirely to prayer and to seeking God in the secret of their hearts. They will also intercede for the church and for the salvation of the whole world.
The time in retreat will balance between silence and solitude found in one’s room or in chapel, prayer in common and in adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, and common celebration of the Mass in a more contemplative manner.
The weekend is a silent retreat allowing space for God to speak to us individually. Individual spiritual direction, as well as opportunity for the Sacrament of Confession, the Mass, and Eucharistic Adoration, will be provided.
Registration is limited and early registration is encouraged. More information and pre-registration is available by visiting www.slcwichita.org and clicking on Calendar of Events, or by calling the center at (316) 744-0167.

A retreat for healing and reconciliation July 13-15 at the SLC
The Return of the Prodigal Son retreat July 13-15 at the Spiritual Life Center will reassure and challenge participants in the fatherhood of our God and in being his son or daughter.
“It’s a combination of art, scripture, Catholic theology, and self-reflection,” Father Ken Van Haverbeke said. “Henri Nouwen’s book’ The Return of the Prodigal Son’ is a personal favorite of mine! Nouwen is very accessible to everyone. We can relate to what he experienced and wrote.”
Nouwen tells of his encounter with the painting in 1986 and then continuing to reflect on the painting throughout his life: how he was the younger (prodigal) son, the elder son, and finally the father in the Gospel story.
What struck him “like a thunderbolt,” though, was a friend’s admonition, ‘Whether you are the younger son or the elder son, you are called to be the father!’ That healing experience for Nouwen changed his life and many others through his writings.
The retreat will include reflections on how we are all called to be in the role of spiritual fatherhood for others. Ultimately the weekend is about healing: healing of memories, healing of emotions, healing of lives.
Fr. Van Haverbeke added, “The retreat is designed to help a person to respond to a merciful Father: a Father who waits for us, and runs to meet us where we are at, not where we are ‘supposed’ to be.
New this year is a Saturday-only option. Participants who cannot make the entire weekend are invited to attend a day long workshop on Saturday, July 14, called “Jesus, Saint Luke, Rembrant, Henri Nouwen, and a Painting.” The workshop participants will join in with the weekend retreatants for Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Want to participate?
Regular retreat pricing applies for the weekend. Register and pay by July 2 to receive an early bird discount. All registrations include a $50 non-refundable deposit. The Saturday-only program cost is $20 and includes lunch. Reservations can be made on line at www.slcwichita.org or by calling (316) 744-0167. Register in advance to ensure space and food quantities.